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Acta Oncol. 2016;55 Suppl 1:19-22. doi: 10.3109/0284186X.2015.1114671. Epub 2016 Jan 11.

Does age affect prognosis in salivary gland carcinoma patients? A national Danish study.

Author information

1
a Department of ENT-HNS , Odense University Hospital , Odense , Denmark ;
2
b Department of Pathology , Odense University Hospital , Odense , Denmark ;
3
c Department of Pathology , Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Copenhagen , Denmark ;
4
d Department of Oncology , Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Copenhagen , Denmark ;
5
e Department of ORL-HNS and Audiology , Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen , Copenhagen , Denmark ;
6
f Department of Oncology , Herlev Hospital , Herlev , Denmark ;
7
g Department of Experimental Clinical Oncology , Aarhus University Hospital , Aarhus , Denmark ;
8
h Department of ENT-HNS , Aarhus University Hospital , Aarhus , Denmark ;
9
i Department of ENT-HNS , Aalborg University Hospital , Aalborg , Denmark ;
10
j Department of Oncology , Aalborg University Hospital , Aalborg , Denmark ;
11
k Department of Oncology , Odense University Hospital , Odense , Denmark.

Abstract

AIM:

To compare incidence, histology, treatment modalities, disease stages, and outcome in elderly patients (≥70 years) compared to younger (<70 years).

METHODS:

From the national Danish salivary gland carcinoma database, 871 patients diagnosed with a primary salivary gland carcinoma from January 1990 to December 2005 were identified. Variables necessary for statistical analyses were extracted from the database.

RESULTS:

The younger patients have a significantly better crude, disease-specific and recurrence-free survival than the elderly ones. In univariate analysis, significantly more patients in the young group were WHO performance status 0 and in disease stage I + II, and they presented with significantly more histological low grade tumors. In multivariate analysis, chronological age seemed to be of no prognostic significance to salivary gland carcinoma patients as opposed to performance status, disease stage and histological grade.

CONCLUSIONS:

Salivary gland carcinoma patients over the age of 70 years have a poor prognosis compared to younger patients, which can be explained by higher disease stages, more histological high grade subtypes and a poorer performance status at the time of diagnosis.

PMID:
26825002
DOI:
10.3109/0284186X.2015.1114671
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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