Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cell. 2016 Jan 28;164(3):512-25. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2015.12.049.

Muscle-type Identity of Proprioceptors Specified by Spatially Restricted Signals from Limb Mesenchyme.

Author information

1
Department of Neuroscience, Biochemistry, and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
2
Department of Biological Sciences, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
3
Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.
4
Department of Neuroscience, Biochemistry, and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Kavli Institute for Brain Science, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: tmj1@columbia.edu.

Abstract

The selectivity with which proprioceptive sensory neurons innervate their central and peripheral targets implies that they exhibit distinctions in muscle-type identity. The molecular correlates of proprioceptor identity and its origins remain largely unknown, however. In screens to define muscle-type proprioceptor character, we find all-or-none differences in gene expression for proprioceptors that control antagonistic muscles at a single hindlimb joint. Analysis of three of these genes, cadherin13 (cdh13), semaphorin5a (sema5a), and cartilage-acidic protein-1 (crtac1), reveals expression in proprioceptor subsets that supply muscle groups located at restricted dorsoventral and proximodistal domains of the limb. Genetically altering the dorsoventral character of the limb mesenchyme elicits a change in the profile of proprioceptor cdh13, sema5a, and crtac1 expression. These findings indicate that proprioceptors acquire aspects of their muscle-type identity in response to mesenchymal signals expressed in restricted proximodistal and dorsoventral domains of the developing limb.

PMID:
26824659
PMCID:
PMC4733250
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2015.12.049
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center