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Int J Clin Exp Pathol. 2015 Nov 1;8(11):14733-40. eCollection 2015.

Endocan of the maternal placenta tissue is increased in pre-eclampsia.

Author information

1
Clinical and Translational Research Center, Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine Shanghai, China.
2
Clinical and Translational Research Center, Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital, Tongji University School of MedicineShanghai, China; Department of Obstetrics, Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital, Tongji University School of MedicineShanghai, China.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Pre-eclampsia (PE) is associated with intravascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. Interestingly, endocan plays a predominant role in the vascular inflammation and is considered as a biomarker of endothelial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to explore whether the endocan levels in serum and placenta were different between pregnant women with PE and the normal pregnancies.

METHODS:

Total 22 patients, including 10 normal pregnant women and 12 patients with PE, were included in this study. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the location of endocan. Then, the mRNA and protein levels of endocan in placenta were detected using qRT-PCR and western blotting. Serum endocan concentration was measured by ELISA.

RESULTS:

Endocan protein was present in the human placenta, and the mRNA and protein levels of placenta tissues were elevated (P < 0.05) in the normal pregnancy with third trimester than those with first trimester. Furthermore, the expression of endocan mRNA and protein were increased in the placenta tissues of PE compared with in the normal pregnancy (P < 0.05); however, the endocan concentration of maternal serum did not have significant differences.

CONCLUSION:

Endocan may play a role in the progression of pregnancy and has a potential to be a new marker for the detective of PE.

KEYWORDS:

Endocan; endothelial dysfunction; pre-eclampsia; vascular inflammation

PMID:
26823798
PMCID:
PMC4713584
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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