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Science. 2016 Jan 29;351(6272):511-4. doi: 10.1126/science.aad0483.

Most microbe-specific naïve CD4⁺ T cells produce memory cells during infection.

Author information

1
Immune Mediated Disease Therapy Group, Genzyme, a Sanofi Company, Framingham, MA 01701, USA.
2
Department of Medicine, Center for Immunology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK.
4
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Center for Immunology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.
5
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Center for Immunology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. jenki002@umn.edu.

Abstract

Infection elicits CD4(+) memory T lymphocytes that participate in protective immunity. Although memory cells are the progeny of naïve T cells, it is unclear that all naïve cells from a polyclonal repertoire have memory cell potential. Using a single-cell adoptive transfer and spleen biopsy method, we found that in mice, essentially all microbe-specific naïve cells produced memory cells during infection. Different clonal memory cell populations had different B cell or macrophage helper compositions that matched effector cell populations generated much earlier in the response. Thus, each microbe-specific naïve CD4(+) T cell produces a distinctive ratio of effector cell types early in the immune response that is maintained as some cells in the clonal population become memory cells.

PMID:
26823430
PMCID:
PMC4776317
DOI:
10.1126/science.aad0483
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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