Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Child Dev. 2016 Jan-Feb;87(1):73-85. doi: 10.1111/cdev.12483.

The Contributions of Maternal Sensitivity and Maternal Depressive Symptoms to Epigenetic Processes and Neuroendocrine Functioning.

Author information

1
The University of Utah.
2
The Brown Center for the Study of Children at Risk.
3
Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth.
4
University of Massachusetts.
5
Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

Abstract

This study tested whether maternal responsiveness may buffer the child to the effects of maternal depressive symptoms on DNA methylation of NR3C1, 11β-HSD2, and neuroendocrine functioning. DNA was derived from buccal epithelial cells and prestress cortisol was obtained from the saliva of 128 infants. Mothers with depressive symptoms who were more responsive and who engaged in more appropriate touch during face-to-face play had infants with less DNA methylation of NR3C1 and 11β-HSD2 compared to mothers with depressive symptoms who were also insensitive. The combination of exposure to maternal depressive symptoms and maternal sensitivity was related to the highest prestress cortisol levels, whereas exposure to maternal depressive symptoms and maternal insensitivity was related to the lowest prestress cortisol levels.

PMID:
26822444
PMCID:
PMC4733872
DOI:
10.1111/cdev.12483
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center