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Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2016 Feb;155(3):471-82. doi: 10.1007/s10549-016-3688-0. Epub 2016 Jan 28.

The effect of resistance training on markers of immune function and inflammation in previously sedentary women recovering from breast cancer: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
School of Science and Technology, University New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia. ahagstro@une.edu.au.
2
School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, Australia. ahagstro@une.edu.au.
3
School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, Australia. p.marshall@westernsydney.edu.au.
4
Institute for Positive Psychology and Education, Australian Catholic University, Strathfield, NSW, Australia. chris.lonsdale@acu.edu.au.
5
School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, Australia. s.papalia@westernsydney.edu.au.
6
School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, Australia. b.cheema@westernsydney.edu.au.
7
The National Institute of Complementary Medicine (NICM), Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, NSW, Australia. b.cheema@westernsydney.edu.au.
8
School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia. catherine.toben@adelaide.edu.au.
9
School of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia. bernhard.baune@adelaide.edu.au.
10
Exercise, Health and Performance Research Group and Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. maria.fiataronesingh@sydney.edu.au.
11
Hebrew Senior-Life and Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA. maria.fiataronesingh@sydney.edu.au.
12
School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, Australia. simon.green@westernsydney.edu.au.
13
School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, Australia. simon.green@westernsydney.edu.au.

Abstract

The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to determine the effects of resistance training (RT) on markers of inflammation and immune function in breast cancer survivors. Thirty-nine breast cancer survivors were randomly assigned to a RT (n = 20) or control (n = 19) group. RT performed supervized exercise three times per week. Natural killer cell (NK) and natural killer T-cell (NKT) function, and markers of inflammation (serum TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, and CRP) were measured before and after training. Changes in NK and NKT cell function were analyzed using ANCOVA, with the change score the dependent variable, and the baseline value of the same variable the covariate. Effect sizes (ES) were calculated via partial eta-squared. We found a significant reduction, and large associated ESs, in the RT group compared to the control group for change in NK cell expression of TNF-α (p = 0.005, ES = 0.21) and NKT cell expression of TNF-α (p = 0.04, ES = 0.12). No differences were observed in any serum marker. Significant improvements in all measurements of strength were found in RT compared to control (p < 0.001; large ESs ranging from 0.32 to 0.51). These data demonstrate that RT has a beneficial effect on the NK and NKT cell expression of TNF-α indicating that RT may be beneficial in improving the inflammatory profile in breast cancer survivors.

KEYWORDS:

Breast cancer survivors; Immune function; Inflammation; Resistance training

PMID:
26820653
DOI:
10.1007/s10549-016-3688-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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