Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Proc Biol Sci. 2016 Jan 27;283(1823). pii: 20152347. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2015.2347.

Corridors restore animal-mediated pollination in fragmented tropical forest landscapes.

Author information

1
Agroecology, Georg-August University Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany Forest Biodiversity Research Network, Forest Ecosystems and Society, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA oso@hotmail.ch.
2
Agroecology, Georg-August University Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany Institute of Landscape Ecology, University of Münster, Münster, Germany.
3
Agroecology, Georg-August University Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.
4
Chair of Statistics, Georg-August University Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.
5
Forest Biodiversity Research Network, Forest Ecosystems and Society, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA.

Abstract

Tropical biodiversity and associated ecosystem functions have become heavily eroded through habitat loss. Animal-mediated pollination is required in more than 94% of higher tropical plant species and 75% of the world's leading food crops, but it remains unclear if corridors avert deforestation-driven pollination breakdown in fragmented tropical landscapes. Here, we used manipulative resource experiments and field observations to show that corridors functionally connect neotropical forest fragments for forest-associated hummingbirds and increase pollen transfer. Further, corridors boosted forest-associated pollinator availability in fragments by 14.3 times compared with unconnected equivalents, increasing overall pollination success. Plants in patches without corridors showed pollination rates equal to bagged control flowers, indicating pollination failure in isolated fragments. This indicates, for the first time, that corridors benefit tropical forest ecosystems beyond boosting local species richness, by functionally connecting mutualistic network partners. We conclude that small-scale adjustments to landscape configuration safeguard native pollinators and associated pollination services in tropical forest landscapes.

KEYWORDS:

ecosystem functioning; functional connectivity; hummingbird; mutualistic interaction; pollen flow; pollinator limitation

PMID:
26817765
PMCID:
PMC4795022
DOI:
10.1098/rspb.2015.2347
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center