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J Foot Ankle Res. 2016 Jan 25;9:3. doi: 10.1186/s13047-016-0134-9. eCollection 2016.

The relationship of foot and ankle mobility to the frontal plane projection angle in asymptomatic adults.

Author information

1
Division of Physiotherapy, School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia Queensland, 4072 Australia.
2
School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia Queensland, 4072 Australia.
3
Division of Physiotherapy, School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia Queensland, 4072 Australia ; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Melbourne School of Engineering, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3010 Australia.
4
Division of Physiotherapy, School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia Queensland, 4072 Australia ; School of Allied Health, College of Science, Health and Engineering, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Vic 3086 Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The frontal plane projection angle (FPPA) is frequently used as a measure of dynamic knee valgus during functional tasks, such as the single leg squat. Increased dynamic knee valgus is observed in people with knee pathologies including patellofemoral pain and anterior cruciate injury. As the foot is the primary interface with the support surface, foot and ankle mobility may affect the FPPA. This study investigated the relationship between foot and ankle mobility and the FPPA in asymptomatic adults.

METHODS:

Thirty healthy people (aged 18-50 years) performed 5 single leg squats. Peak FPPA and FPPA excursion were determined from digital video recordings. Foot mobility was quantified as the difference in dorsal midfoot height or midfoot width, between non-weightbearing and bilateral weightbearing positions. Ankle joint dorsiflexion range was measured as the maximum distance in centimetres between the longest toe and the wall during a knee-to-wall lunge. Linear regressions with generalised estimating equations were used to examine relationships between variables.

RESULTS:

Higher midfoot width mobility was associated with greater peak FPPA (β 0.90, p < 0.001, odds ratio [OR] 2.5), and FPPA excursion (β 0.67, p < 0.001, OR 1.9). Lower midfoot height mobility was associated with greater peak FPPA (β 0.37, p = 0.030, OR 1.4) and FPPA excursion (β 0.30, p = 0.020, OR 1.3). Lower ankle joint dorsiflexion was also associated with greater peak FPPA (β 0.61, p = 0.008, OR 1.8) and greater FPPA excursion (β 0.56, p < 0.001, OR 1.7).

CONCLUSIONS:

Foot and ankle mobility was significantly related to the FPPA during the single leg squat in healthy individuals. Specifically, higher midfoot width mobility, or lower ankle joint dorsiflexion range and midfoot height mobility, were associated with a greater FPPA. These foot mobility factors should be considered in the clinical management of knee-related disorders that are associated with a high FPPA.

KEYWORDS:

Ankle; Foot; Knee; Linear models

PMID:
26816531
PMCID:
PMC4727299
DOI:
10.1186/s13047-016-0134-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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