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J Can Chiropr Assoc. 2015 Dec;59(4):349-62.

The effectiveness of structured patient education for the management of musculoskeletal disorders and injuries of the extremities: a systematic review by the Ontario Protocol for Traffic Injury Management (OPTIMa) Collaboration.

Author information

1
UOIT-CMCC Centre for the Study of Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) and Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC); Graduate Education and Research Programs, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College; Division of Undergraduate Education, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College.
2
UOIT-CMCC Centre for the Study of Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) and Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC); Canada Research Chair in Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation, University of Ontario Institute of Technology; Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ontario Institute of Technology.
3
Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Alberta.
4
UOIT-CMCC Centre for the Study of Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) and Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC); Graduate Education and Research Programs, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College.
5
UOIT-CMCC Centre for the Study of Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) and Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC); Division of Undergraduate Education, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College.
6
Graduate Education and Research Programs, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College; Adjunct Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, UOIT.
7
UOIT-CMCC Centre for the Study of Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) and Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC); Graduate Education and Research Programs, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College; Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ontario Institute of Technology.
8
UOIT-CMCC Centre for the Study of Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) and Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ontario Institute of Technology.
9
Clinical Research Coordinator, UOIT-CMCC Centre for the Study of Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation; Assistant Professor, Division of Clinical Education, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC).
10
UOIT-CMCC Centre for the Study of Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) and Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC).

Abstract

in English, French

PURPOSE:

To determine the effectiveness of structured patient education for the management of musculoskeletal disorders and injuries of the extremities.

METHODS:

We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from January 1, 1990 to March 14, 2015. Paired reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts for eligibility. The internal validity of studies was assessed using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) criteria. Results from studies with a low risk of bias were synthesized using the best-evidence synthesis methodology.

RESULTS:

We identified two randomized trials with a low risk of bias. Our review suggests that: 1) multimodal care and corticosteroid injections lead to faster pain relief and improvement than reassurance and advice in the short-term and similar outcomes in the long-term for patients with persistent lateral epicondylitis; and 2) providing health education material alone may be less effective than multimodal care for the management of persistent patellofemoral pain syndrome.

CONCLUSION:

Our systematic search of the literature demonstrates that little is known about the effectiveness of structured patient education for the management of musculoskeletal disorders and injuries of the extremities. Two studies suggest that when used alone, structured patient education may be less effective than other interventions used to manage persistent lateral epicondylitis and persistent patellofemoral syndrome.

KEYWORDS:

chiropractic; extremity; injury; lateral epicondylitis; patellofemoral pain; patient education; systematic review

PMID:
26816413
PMCID:
PMC4711327

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