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J Can Chiropr Assoc. 2015 Dec;59(4):332-48.

Self-reported attitudes, skills and use of evidence-based practice among Canadian doctors of chiropractic: a national survey.

Author information

1
Assistant Professor, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University; Professor, Département Chiropratique, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières.
2
Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy and Health and Community Systems, University of Pittsburgh.
3
Senior Research Fellow, School of Nursing & Midwifery, University of South Australia.
4
Division of Graduate Education and Research, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College.
5
Associate Professor, Center for Spirituality & Healing, Academic Health Center, University of Minnesota.
6
Associate Professor, Department of Physical Therapy and Clinical and Translational Science Institute, University of Pittsburgh.

Abstract

in English, French

OBJECTIVES:

To identify Canadian chiropractors' attitudes, skills and use of evidence based practice (EBP), as well as their level of awareness of previously published chiropractic clinical practice guidelines (CPGs).

METHODS:

7,200 members of the Canadian Chiropractic Association were invited by e-mail to complete an online version of the Evidence Based practice Attitude & utilisation SurvEy (EBASE); a valid and reliable measure of participant attitudes, skills and use of EBP.

RESULTS:

Questionnaires were completed by 554 respondents. Most respondents (>75%) held positive attitudes toward EBP. Over half indicated a high level of self-reported skills in EBP, and over 90% expressed an interest in improving these skills. A majority of respondents (65%) reported over half of their practice was based on evidence from clinical research, and only half (52%) agreed that chiropractic CPGs significantly impacted on their practice.

CONCLUSIONS:

While most Canadian chiropractors held positive attitudes towards EBP, believed EBP was useful, and were interested in improving their skills in EBP, many did not use research evidence or CPGs to guide clinical decision making. Our findings should be interpreted cautiously due to the low response rate.

KEYWORDS:

chiropractic; complementary and alternative medicine; evidence-based practice; survey

PMID:
26816412
PMCID:
PMC4711333

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