Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Mult Scler. 2016 Oct;22(12):1596-1606. Epub 2016 Jan 26.

Validity of visual perceptive computing for static posturography in patients with multiple sclerosis.

Author information

1
NeuroCure Clinical Research Center, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany/Clinical and Experimental Multiple Sclerosis Research Center, Department of Neurology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
2
NeuroCure Clinical Research Center, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.
3
Motognosis UG, Berlin, Germany.
4
NeuroCure Clinical Research Center, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany/Motognosis UG, Berlin, Germany/Clinical and Experimental Multiple Sclerosis Research Center, Department of Neurology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany alexander.brandt@charite.de.
5
NeuroCure Clinical Research Center, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany/Department of Neurology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients frequently have postural control impairment but quantitative posturography is difficult to perform in clinical care. Recent technology facilitates new posturography approaches.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate construct validity of visual perceptive computing (VPC) for static posturography to study postural control in MS patients.

METHODS:

A total of 90 MS patients and 59 healthy controls (HCs) performed three stance tests: open, closed and tandem stance. Static posturography was performed using a VPC system with Microsoft Kinect. Clinical assessments included Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), Timed-25-Foot-Walk, Short-Maximum-Speed-Walk and 12-item MS Walking Scale (MSWS-12) questionnaire. Reliability was assessed with intra-class correlation coefficients at retest.

RESULTS:

As a group, MS patients performed worse than HCs in all tests. The closed stance test showed best applicability and reliability. With closed eyes, in 36.7% of patients, the three-dimensional mean angular sway velocity (MSV-3D) was above HCs' 95th percentile. Higher MSV-3D was associated with decreased walking speed (p < 0.001); worse clinical scores, mainly attributable to the cerebellar functional system score (p < 0.001); and reflected in self-reported walking disability (MSWS-12, p < 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

Postural control can be reliably assessed by VPC-based static posturography in patients with MS. Abnormal postural control seems to predominantly reflect involvement of cerebellar circuits with impact on gait and walking disability.

KEYWORDS:

Multiple sclerosis; static posturography; visual perceptive computing

PMID:
26814201
DOI:
10.1177/1352458515625807
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center