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J Oncol Pract. 2016 Feb;12(2):145, e108-17. doi: 10.1200/JOP.2015.009449. Epub 2016 Jan 26.

ReCAP: ASCO Core Curriculum for Cancer Survivorship Education.

Author information

1
Icahn School of Medicine at Mt Sinai; New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY; University of Tampa, Tampa, FL; University of Chicago, Chicago, IL; City of Hope, Duarte, CA; Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates; Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA; University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; and National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD charles.shapiro@mssm.edu.
2
Icahn School of Medicine at Mt Sinai; New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY; University of Tampa, Tampa, FL; University of Chicago, Chicago, IL; City of Hope, Duarte, CA; Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates; Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA; University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; and National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD.

Abstract

CONTEXT AND QUESTIONS ASKED:

The number of cancer survivors is increasing exponentially. Currently there about 15 million cancer survivors, and by 2025, there will be nearly 20 million. Who will provide survivorship care, what are evidenced-based or best care practices, what are best methods to disseminate this information and assess its impact on physician practice, and what are the most cost-effective health care delivery models to serve the majority of survivors?

SUMMARY ANSWER:

The ASCO Survivorship Committee in collaboration with the ASCO Professional Development Committee developed a core curriculum and core competencies for physicians, allied health professionals, training programs, and policymaking organizations. Adapted from Institute of Medicine recommendations for survivorship care, the core curriculum and competencies include the following subheadings: surveillance for recurrence and second malignancies, long-term and late effects, health promotion and prevention, psychosocial well-being, special populations including adolescent and young adult survivors, older adult cancer survivors, caregivers of cancer survivors and communication and care coordination.

METHODS:

An environmental scan (a process that systematically surveys and interprets relevant data to identify opportunities and barriers) for survivorship was performed. Although survivorship content exists in various courses, conferences, guidelines, and Web-based applications, the information is incomplete and not easily found. Hence, there was a need for this content to be easy to access and available in one place. Content experts formulated the individual sections based on the environmental scan and their knowledge of the various subheadings.

BIAS, CONFOUNDING FACTORS, DRAWBACKS:

Both an environmental scan and a comprehensive literature review have standard methodologies. The differences are in scope; an environmental scan is more like an overview, and the standard literature review is more granular. For this article, we felt that environmental scan better served the purpose of developing a survivorship core curriculum and competencies.

REAL-LIFE IMPLICATIONS:

Survivorship care is one the most challenging problems oncologists face today and in the near future. Fundamental to the relatively new field of survivorship care is this core curriculum and competencies, which provide the framework necessary to generate appropriate referrals depending on local practices and expertise.

PMID:
26813926
DOI:
10.1200/JOP.2015.009449
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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