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Nat Commun. 2016 Jan 27;7:10321. doi: 10.1038/ncomms10321.

Bone marrow-derived monocytes give rise to self-renewing and fully differentiated Kupffer cells.

Author information

1
Unit of Immunoregulation and Mucosal Immunology, VIB Inflammation Research Center, Ghent 9000, Belgium.
2
Department of Biomedical Molecular Biology, Ghent University, Ghent 9000, Belgium.
3
Myeloid Cell Immunology, VIB, Brussels 1050, Belgium.
4
Cellular and Molecular Immunology Research Group, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels 1050, Belgium.
5
Department of Internal Medicine, Ghent University, Ghent 9000, Belgium.
6
VIB Bio Imaging Core, Ghent 9000, Belgium.
7
Microscopy Core Facility, VIB, Inflammation Research Center, Ghent 9000, Belgium.
8
In Vivo Cellular and Molecular Imaging Research Group, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels 1050, Belgium.

Abstract

Self-renewing tissue-resident macrophages are thought to be exclusively derived from embryonic progenitors. However, whether circulating monocytes can also give rise to such macrophages has not been formally investigated. Here we use a new model of diphtheria toxin-mediated depletion of liver-resident Kupffer cells to generate niche availability and show that circulating monocytes engraft in the liver, gradually adopt the transcriptional profile of their depleted counterparts and become long-lived self-renewing cells. Underlining the physiological relevance of our findings, circulating monocytes also contribute to the expanding pool of macrophages in the liver shortly after birth, when macrophage niches become available during normal organ growth. Thus, like embryonic precursors, monocytes can and do give rise to self-renewing tissue-resident macrophages if the niche is available to them.

PMID:
26813785
PMCID:
PMC4737801
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms10321
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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