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Child Obes. 2016 Apr;12(2):119-25. doi: 10.1089/chi.2015.0083. Epub 2016 Jan 26.

Passive Smoke Exposure and Its Effects on Cognition, Sleep, and Health Outcomes in Overweight and Obese Children.

Author information

1
1 Georgia Prevention Institute, Department of Pediatrics, Augusta University , Augusta, GA.
2
2 Pediatric Associates of Mobile , Mobile, AL.
3
3 University Pediatrics, Memorial University Medical Center , Savannah, GA.
4
4 Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University , Augusta, GA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Passive smoke exposure (PSE) may be a risk factor for childhood overweight and obesity and is associated with worse neurocognitive development, cognition, and sleep in children. The purpose of the study is to examine the effects of PSE on adiposity, cognition, and sleep in overweight and obese children using an objective measure of PSE.

METHODS:

Overweight or obese children (n = 222) aged 7-11 (9.4 ± 1.1 years; 58% black; 58% female; 85% obese) were recruited from schools near Augusta, Georgia, over the course of the school year from 2003-2006 for a clinical trial, with data analyzed in 2009-2010. Passive smoke exposure was measured with plasma cotinine. Health, cognitive, and sleep measures and parent report of smoke exposure were obtained.

RESULTS:

Overweight and obese children with PSE had greater overall and central adiposity than nonexposed overweight and obese children (p < 0.03). However, PSE was unrelated to prediabetes, insulin resistance, or visceral fat. PSE was linked to poorer cognitive scores (p < 0.04) independent of adiposity, but was not related to sleep-disordered breathing.

CONCLUSIONS:

PSE is associated with fatness and poorer cognition in children. Tailored interventions that target multiple health risk factors including nutrition, physical activity, and tobacco use in children and families are needed to prevent adverse health outcomes related to tobacco use and obesity.

PMID:
26812049
PMCID:
PMC4817566
DOI:
10.1089/chi.2015.0083
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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