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J Neurol. 2016 Apr;263(4):677-88. doi: 10.1007/s00415-016-8030-6. Epub 2016 Jan 25.

Taste dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

Author information

1
Smell and Taste Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 5 Ravdin Building, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19104-4823, USA. richard.doty@uphs.upenn.edu.
2
Department of Otorhinolarynology: Head and Neck Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA. richard.doty@uphs.upenn.edu.
3
Smell and Taste Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 5 Ravdin Building, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19104-4823, USA.
4
Department of Otorhinolarynology: Head and Neck Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA.
5
Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine, Henry Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD, USA.
6
Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, 21287, MD, USA.
7
Medical Imaging Section, Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvlania, Philadelphia, 19104, PA, USA.
8
Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department, İzmir Institute of Technology, Urla, Izmir, 35430, Turkey.
9
Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, 48824, East Lansing, MI, USA.
10
Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, 10032, USA.
11
Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA.

Abstract

Empirical studies of taste function in multiple sclerosis (MS) are rare. Moreover, a detailed assessment of whether quantitative measures of taste function correlate with the punctate and patchy myelin-related lesions found throughout the CNS of MS patients has not been made. We administered a 96-trial test of sweet (sucrose), sour (citric acid), bitter (caffeine) and salty (NaCl) taste perception to the left and right anterior (CN VII) and posterior (CN IX) tongue regions of 73 MS patients and 73 matched controls. The number and volume of lesions were assessed using quantitative MRI in 52 brain regions of 63 of the MS patients. Taste identification scores were significantly lower in the MS patients for sucrose (p = 0.0002), citric acid (p = 0.0001), caffeine (p = 0.0372) and NaCl (p = 0.0004) and were present in both anterior and posterior tongue regions. The percent of MS patients with identification scores falling below the 5th percentile of controls was 15.07 % for caffeine, 21.9 % for citric acid, 24.66 % for sucrose, and 31.50 % for NaCl. Such scores were inversely correlated with lesion volumes in the temporal, medial frontal, and superior frontal lobes, and with the number of lesions in the left and right superior frontal lobes, right anterior cingulate gyrus, and left parietal operculum. Regardless of the subject group, women outperformed men on the taste measures. These findings indicate that a sizable number of MS patients exhibit taste deficits that are associated with MS-related lesions throughout the brain.

KEYWORDS:

Chemosensory transduction; Magnetic resonance imaging; Multiple sclerosis; Sex differences; Taste; Taste disorders

PMID:
26810729
PMCID:
PMC5399510
DOI:
10.1007/s00415-016-8030-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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