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Psychooncology. 2016 Dec;25(12):1380-1392. doi: 10.1002/pon.4075. Epub 2016 Jan 26.

Economic evaluations of psychosocial interventions in cancer: a systematic review.

Author information

1
Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention Research, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
2
Discipline of Paediatrics, School of Women's and Children's Health, UNSW Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
3
Centre for Cancer Research, Westmead Millennium Institute for Medical Research and Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
4
NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Although the effectiveness of many psychosocial interventions for people with cancer has been established, one barrier to implementation in routine clinical care is a lack of data on cost-effectiveness. We conducted a systematic review to assess the cost-effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for improving psychological adjustment among people with cancer.

METHODS:

A systematic review of the literature, study appraisal and narrative synthesis.

RESULTS:

Eight studies involving 1668 patients were identified. Four of these reported outcomes in a cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) framework. Six studies reported psychosocial interventions to be cost-effective for improving health-related quality of life, mood, pain, distress or fear of cancer progression, compared with usual care. Of the six psychosocial interventions identified as cost-effective, three were cognitive-behavioural therapy-based interventions, one was a nurse-delivered telephone follow-up plus educational group programme, one was a group-based exercise and psychosocial intervention and one was a series of 10 face-to-face or telephone-based individual support sessions delivered by a nurse. The quality of studies assessed according to the Consensus Health Economic Criteria-list criteria was good overall; however, some studies were limited by their choice of outcome measure and omission of important categories of costs.

CONCLUSIONS:

Several psychosocial interventions, particularly those based on cognitive-behavioural therapy, have been demonstrated to represent good value for money in cancer care. Future research should include a clear definition of the economic question, inclusion of all relevant costs, and consideration of utility-based quality of life measures for QALY estimation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PMID:
26810383
DOI:
10.1002/pon.4075
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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