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Plant Mol Biol. 2016 Aug;91(6):617-27. doi: 10.1007/s11103-016-0438-y. Epub 2016 Jan 25.

Hormonal control of sulfate uptake and assimilation.

Author information

1
Botanical Institute, Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences, University of Cologne, Zülpicher Str. 47b, 50674, Cologne, Germany.
2
Botanical Institute, Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences, University of Cologne, Zülpicher Str. 47b, 50674, Cologne, Germany. skopriva@uni-koeln.de.

Abstract

Plant hormones have a plethora of functions in control of plant development, stress response, and primary metabolism, including nutrient homeostasis. In the plant nutrition, the interplay of hormones with responses to nitrate and phosphate deficiency is well described, but relatively little is known about the interaction between phytohormones and regulation of sulfur metabolism. As for other nutrients, sulfate deficiency results in modulation of root architecture, where hormones are expected to play an important role. Accordingly, sulfate deficiency induces genes involved in metabolism of tryptophane and auxin. Also jasmonate biosynthesis is induced, pointing to the need of increase the defense capabilities of the plants when sulfur is limiting. However, hormones affect also sulfate uptake and assimilation. The pathway is coordinately induced by jasmonate and the key enzyme, adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase, is additionally regulated by ethylene, abscisic acid, nitric oxid, and other phytohormones. Perhaps the most intriguing link between hormones and sulfate assimilation is the fact that the main regulator of the response to sulfate starvation, SULFATE LIMITATION1 (SLIM1) belongs to the family of ethylene related transcription factors. We will review the current knowledge of interplay between phytohormones and control of sulfur metabolism and discuss the main open questions.

KEYWORDS:

Cysteine; Glucosinolates; Glutathione; Phytohormones; Sulfate assimilation

PMID:
26810064
DOI:
10.1007/s11103-016-0438-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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