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ASAIO J. 2016 May-Jun;62(3):329-31. doi: 10.1097/MAT.0000000000000348.

Darcy Permeability of Hollow Fiber Membrane Bundles Made from Membrana Polymethylpentene Fibers Used in Respiratory Assist Devices.

Author information

1
From the *McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, †Department of Bioengineering, ‡Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, and §Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Abstract

Hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) are used in blood oxygenators for cardiopulmonary bypass or in next generation artificial lungs. Flow analyses of these devices is typically done using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling HFM bundles as porous media, using a Darcy permeability coefficient estimated from the Blake-Kozeny (BK) equation to account for viscous drag from fibers. We recently published how well this approach can predict Darcy permeability for fiber bundles made from polypropylene HFMs, showing the prediction can be significantly improved using an experimentally derived correlation between the BK constant (A) and bundle porosity (ε). In this study, we assessed how well our correlation for A worked for predicting the Darcy permeability of fiber bundles made from Membrana polymethylpentene (PMP) HFMs, which are increasingly being used clinically. Swatches in the porosity range of 0.4 to 0.8 were assessed in which sheets of fiber were stacked in parallel, perpendicular, and angled configurations. Our previously published correlation predicted Darcy within ±8%. A new correlation based on current and past measured permeability was determined: A = 497ε - 103; using this correlation measured Darcy permeability was within ±6%. This correlation varied from 8% to -3.5% of our prior correlation over the tested porosity range.

PMID:
26809086
PMCID:
PMC4850091
DOI:
10.1097/MAT.0000000000000348
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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