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Int J Gynecol Cancer. 2016 Mar;26(3):431-6. doi: 10.1097/IGC.0000000000000639.

Outcomes of Incidental Fallopian Tube High-Grade Serous Carcinoma and Serous Tubal Intraepithelial Carcinoma in Women at Low Risk of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer.

Author information

1
*Department of Medical Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; †National Cancer Centre Singapore, Singapore; ‡Department of Pathology, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, United Kingdom; §Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Royal Alexandra Hospital, University of Alberta, Edmonton; ∥Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta; ¶Department of Pathology, Royal Jubilee Hospital and the University of British Columbia, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada; #Department of Oncology, NI Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, United Kingdom; and **Department of Pathology, Vancouver General Hospital and the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The natural history and optimal management of serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC), regardless of BRCA status, is unknown. We report the follow-up findings of a series of incidental fallopian tube high-grade serous carcinomas (HGSCs) and STICs identified in women at low risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC), undergoing surgery for other indications.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Cases of incidental STIC and HGSC were identified from 2008. Patients with known BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, or a family history of ovarian or breast cancer before the diagnosis of STIC or HGSC were excluded. A retrospective chart review was conducted to obtain clinical data.

RESULTS:

Eighteen cases were identified with a median follow-up of 25 months (range, 4-88 months). Twelve of 18 patients had a diagnosis of STIC with no associated invasive HGSC and 6 had STIC associated with other invasive malignancies. Completion staging surgery was performed on 7 of the 18 patients, including 5 of 12 in which there was STIC only identified on primary surgery; 3 cases were upstaged from STIC only to HGSC based on the staging surgery. Recurrence of HGSC occurred in 2 of the 18 patients. BRCA testing was performed on 3 patients, 1 of whom tested positive for a pathogenic BRCA1 mutation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study suggests that completion staging surgery for incidental STICs in non-BRCA patients may be considered. These patients should be offered hereditary testing. The Pelvic-Ovarian cancer INTerception (POINT) Project is an international registry set up to add to our understanding of STICs.

PMID:
26807643
DOI:
10.1097/IGC.0000000000000639
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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