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Mol Cell Probes. 2016 Apr;30(2):61-5. doi: 10.1016/j.mcp.2016.01.006. Epub 2016 Jan 22.

Association studies on the bovine lipoprotein lipase gene polymorphism with growth and carcass quality traits in Qinchuan cattle.

Author information

1
College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, PR China. Electronic address: 26660162@qq.com.
2
College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, PR China. Electronic address: linga2177@163.com.
3
College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, PR China. Electronic address: 827136244@qq.com.
4
College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, PR China. Electronic address: zhao.chunping@hotmail.com.
5
College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, PR China; National Beef Cattle Improvement Center of Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, PR China. Electronic address: zanlinsen@163.com.

Abstract

Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is considered as an essential enzyme in lipid deposition and tissue metabolism. It has been proposed to be a lead candidate gene for genetic markers of lipid deposition and energy balance. In this paper, polymorphisms in the LPL gene were investigated in 554 Chinese Qinchuan cattle by PCR-RFLP and DNA sequencing. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified, which included one mutation (g.91C > T) in the 5'untranslated region (UTR), four synonymous mutations (g.17015A > G, g.18362G > A, g.18377T > C and g.19873T > C) and two mutations (g.25225A > G and g.25316T > G) in the 3'UTR. The frequencies of SNP g.18377T > C and g.25316T > G were skewed from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in all the samples (chi-square test, P < 0.05). An association analysis showed that five loci (except for g.91C > T and g.18377T > C) were significantly correlated with some growth and carcass quality traits. These results demonstrate that LPL might be a potential candidate gene for marker-assisted selection (MAS).

KEYWORDS:

Carcass quality; Growth; LPL gene; Polymorphism

PMID:
26806454
DOI:
10.1016/j.mcp.2016.01.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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