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Alzheimers Dement. 2016 Jul;12(7):805-14. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2015.12.009. Epub 2016 Jan 21.

Beta-amyloid and cognitive decline in late middle age: Findings from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention study.

Author information

  • 1Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA; Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA. Electronic address: lrclark@medicine.wisc.edu.
  • 2Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA; Institute on Aging, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA; Neuroscience and Public Policy Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
  • 3Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA.
  • 4Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA; Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA; Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Wm. S. Middleton Veterans Hospital, Madison, WI, USA.
  • 5Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA; Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA.
  • 6Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA; Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Wm. S. Middleton Veterans Hospital, Madison, WI, USA.
  • 7Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA; Department of Statistics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.
  • 8Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA; Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA.
  • 9Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA; Department of Neurology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA.
  • 10Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA; Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA; Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA.
  • 11Wisconsin Alzheimer's Institute, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA; Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA; Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Wm. S. Middleton Veterans Hospital, Madison, WI, USA; Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The present study investigated the relationship between beta-amyloid (Aβ) and cognition in a late middle-aged cohort at risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD).

METHODS:

One eighty-four participants (mean age = 60; 72% parental history of AD) completed a [C-11]Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography scan and serial cognitive evaluations. A global measure of Aβ burden was calculated, and composite scores assessing learning, delayed memory, and executive functioning were computed.

RESULTS:

Higher Aβ was associated with classification of psychometric mild cognitive impairment (MCI) at follow-up (P < .01). Linear mixed effects regression results indicated higher Aβ was associated with greater rates of decline in delayed memory (P < .01) and executive functioning (P < .05). Apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 status moderated the relationship between Aβ and cognitive trajectories (P values <.01).

DISCUSSION:

In individuals at risk for AD, greater Aβ in late middle age is associated with increased likelihood of MCI at follow-up and steeper rates of cognitive decline.

KEYWORDS:

APOE; Alzheimer's disease; Amyloid imaging; Cognition; Mild cognitive impairment; Preclinical Alzheimer's disease

PMID:
26806386
PMCID:
PMC4947439
[Available on 2017-07-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2015.12.009
[PubMed - in process]
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