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Cereb Cortex. 2016 Apr;26(4):1349-64. doi: 10.1093/cercor/bhv330. Epub 2016 Jan 24.

β-Adrenergic Control of Hippocampal Function: Subserving the Choreography of Synaptic Information Storage and Memory.

Author information

1
Department of Neurophysiology, Medical Faculty, Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum, Germany.

Abstract

Noradrenaline (NA) is a key neuromodulator for the regulation of behavioral state and cognition. It supports learning by increasing arousal and vigilance, whereby new experiences are "earmarked" for encoding. Within the hippocampus, experience-dependent information storage occurs by means of synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, novel spatial, contextual, or associative learning drives changes in synaptic strength, reflected by the strengthening of long-term potentiation (LTP) or long-term depression (LTD). NA acting on β-adrenergic receptors (β-AR) is a key determinant as to whether new experiences result in persistent hippocampal synaptic plasticity. This can even dictate the direction of change of synaptic strength.The different hippocampal subfields play different roles in encoding components of a spatial representation through LTP and LTD. Strikingly, the sensitivity of synaptic plasticity in these subfields to β-adrenergic control is very distinct (dentate gyrus > CA3 > CA1). Moreover, NA released from the locus coeruleus that acts on β-AR leads to hippocampal LTD and an enhancement of LTD-related memory processing. We propose that NA acting on hippocampal β-AR, that is graded according to the novelty or saliency of the experience, determines the content and persistency of synaptic information storage in the hippocampal subfields and therefore of spatial memories.

KEYWORDS:

hippocampus; memory; noradrenaline; synaptic plasticity; β-adrenergic receptors

PMID:
26804338
PMCID:
PMC4785955
DOI:
10.1093/cercor/bhv330
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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