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Burns. 2016 Mar;42(2):384-91. doi: 10.1016/j.burns.2015.08.027. Epub 2016 Jan 21.

Novel burn device for rapid, reproducible burn wound generation.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States; Center for Regenerative Medicine and Cell-Based Therapies (CRMCBT), The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States.
2
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States.
3
Research Department, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Cincinnati, OH, United States; Department of Surgery, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, United States.
4
Center for Regenerative Medicine and Cell-Based Therapies (CRMCBT), The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States; Department of Surgery, The Ohio State University, Comprehensive Wound Center, Columbus, OH, United States.
5
Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States; Center for Regenerative Medicine and Cell-Based Therapies (CRMCBT), The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States; Research Department, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Cincinnati, OH, United States. Electronic address: powell.299@osu.edu.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Scarring following full thickness burns leads to significant reductions in range of motion and quality of life for burn patients. To effectively study scar development and the efficacy of anti-scarring treatments in a large animal model (female red Duroc pigs), reproducible, uniform, full-thickness, burn wounds are needed to reduce variability in observed results that occur with burn depth. Prior studies have proposed that initial temperature of the burner, contact time with skin, thermal capacity of burner material, and the amount of pressure applied to the skin need to be strictly controlled to ensure reproducibility. The purpose of this study was to develop a new burner that enables temperature and pressure to be digitally controlled and monitored in real-time throughout burn wound creation and compare it to a standard burn device.

METHODS:

A custom burn device was manufactured with an electrically heated burn stylus and a temperature control feedback loop via an electronic microstat. Pressure monitoring was controlled by incorporation of a digital scale into the device, which measured downward force. The standard device was comprised of a heat resistant handle with a long rod connected to the burn stylus, which was heated using a hot plate. To quantify skin surface temperature and internal stylus temperature as a function of contact time, the burners were heated to the target temperature (200±5°C) and pressed into the skin for 40s to create the thermal injuries. Time to reach target temperature and elapsed time between burns were recorded. In addition, each unit was evaluated for reproducibility within and across three independent users by generating burn wounds at contact times spanning from 5 to 40s at a constant pressure and at pressures of 1 or 3lbs with a constant contact time of 40s. Biopsies were collected for histological analysis and burn depth quantification using digital image analysis (ImageJ).

RESULTS:

The custom burn device maintained both its internal temperature and the skin surface temperature near target temperature throughout contact time. In contrast, the standard burner required more than 20s of contact time to raise the skin surface temperature to target due to its quickly decreasing internal temperature. The custom burner was able to create four consecutive burns in less than half the time of the standard burner. Average burn depth scaled positively with time and pressure in both burn units. However, the distribution of burn depth within each time-pressure combination in the custom device was significantly smaller than with the standard device and independent of user.

CONCLUSIONS:

The custom burn device's ability to continually heat the burn stylus and actively control pressure and temperature allowed for more rapid and reproducible burn wounds. Burns of tailored and repeatable depths, independent of user, provide a platform for the study of anti-scar and other wound healing therapies without the added variable of non-uniform starting injury.

KEYWORDS:

Burns; Device; Porcine model; Pressure

PMID:
26803369
PMCID:
PMC5207794
[Available on 2017-03-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.burns.2015.08.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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