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Eur Psychiatry. 2016 Feb;32:34-41. doi: 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2015.10.007. Epub 2016 Jan 21.

Burnout syndrome among psychiatric trainees in 22 countries: Risk increased by long working hours, lack of supervision, and psychiatry not being first career choice.

Author information

1
Unit for Social and Community Psychiatry, WHO Collaborating Centre for Mental Health Service Development, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London E13 8SP, UK. Electronic address: n.jovanovic@qmul.ac.uk.
2
Department of Psychology, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 2, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia.
3
Department of Psychiatry, University of Naples SUN, Largo Madonna delle Grazie, 80138 Naples, Italy.
4
Department of Liaison Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Our Lady's Hospital Crumlin, Dublin, Ireland.
5
Department of Diagnostic-Clinical Medicine and Public Health University of Modena & Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Zagreb University Hospital Centre, Kispaticeva 12, 10 000 Zagreb, Croatia.
7
Private psychiatric practice, 140, avenue Victor-Hugo, 75116 Paris, France; UPC KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
8
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
9
Department of Psychiatry, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic; Institute of Neuropsychiatric Care (INEP), Prague, Czech Republic.
10
Clinical Hospital of Psychiatry 2, Tirgu Mures, Romania; Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK.
11
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Hospital de D. Estefânia, Lisbon, Portugal.
12
Laboratoire de Neurosciences de Besançon, Université de France-Comté, 25000 Besançon, France; Newham centre for mental health, East London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.
13
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo, Japan.
14
HSSD Guernsey, UK; UCL, London, UK.
15
Private psychiatric practice, 122A, New Henry House, 10, Ice House Street, Central, Hong Kong.
16
Department of child psychiatry, University Children's Hospital, Bohoričeva 20, 1525 Ljubljana, Slovenia.
17
Department for Affective Disorders, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark.
18
Private Psychiatric Practice, Athens, Greece.
19
Department for Psychiatry, University Clinical Center Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina.
20
University of Latvia, 19 Raina Blvd., Riga LV 1586, Latvia.
21
Private psychiatric practice, Cape Town, South Africa.
22
Union Sanitaire et Sociale Aude Pyrénées, Clinique Via Domitia, 11100 Narbonne, France; Psychiatry Clinic of University of Tartu, 50417, Estonia.
23
Siberian State Medical University, Moskovsky tract 2, Tomsk 634050, Russia.
24
Republican Research and Practice Centre of Mental Health, Minsk, Belarus.
25
Landesklinikum Baden-Mödling, Standort Baden, Austria.
26
Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust, Norwich, UK; University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Postgraduate medical trainees experience high rates of burnout, but evidence regarding psychiatric trainees is missing. We aim to determine burnout rates among psychiatric trainees, and identify individual, educational and work-related factors associated with severe burnout.

METHODS:

In an online survey psychiatric trainees from 22 countries were asked to complete the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI-GS) and provide information on individual, educational and work-related parameters. Linear mixed models were used to predict the MBI-GS scores, and a generalized linear mixed model to predict severe burnout.

RESULTS:

This is the largest study on burnout and training conditions among psychiatric trainees to date. Complete data were obtained from 1980 out of 7625 approached trainees (26%; range 17.8-65.6%). Participants were 31.9 (SD 5.3) years old with 2.8 (SD 1.9) years of training. Severe burnout was found in 726 (36.7%) trainees. The risk was higher for trainees who were younger (P<0.001), without children (P=0.010), and had not opted for psychiatry as a first career choice (P=0.043). After adjustment for socio-demographic characteristics, years in training and country differences in burnout, severe burnout remained associated with long working hours (P<0.001), lack of supervision (P<0.001), and not having regular time to rest (P=0.001). Main findings were replicated in a sensitivity analysis with countries with response rate above 50%.

CONCLUSIONS:

Besides previously described risk factors such as working hours and younger age, this is the first evidence of negative influence of lack of supervision and not opting for psychiatry as a first career choice on trainees' burnout.

KEYWORDS:

Burnout; Psychiatry; Risk factors; Supervision; Training

PMID:
26802982
DOI:
10.1016/j.eurpsy.2015.10.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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