Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Environ Entomol. 2016 Apr;45(2):384-9. doi: 10.1093/ee/nvv229. Epub 2016 Jan 22.

Attraction, Feeding Preference, and Performance of Spodoptera frugiperda Larvae (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Reared on Two Varieties of Maize.

Author information

1
El Colegio de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR), Grupo de Ecología de Artrópodos y Manejo de plagas, Carretera Antiguo Aeropuerto km 2.5, Tapachula, Chiapas CP 30700, Mexico (wdelarosa@ecosur.edu.mx; jrojas@ecosur.mx; lcruz@ecosur.mx; acastill@ecosur.mx; emr@ecosur.mx), and.
2
El Colegio de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR), Grupo de Ecología de Artrópodos y Manejo de plagas, Carretera Antiguo Aeropuerto km 2.5, Tapachula, Chiapas CP 30700, Mexico (wdelarosa@ecosur.edu.mx; jrojas@ecosur.mx; lcruz@ecosur.mx; acastill@ecosur.mx; emr@ecosur.mx), and emr@ecosur.mx.

Abstract

The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is an economically important pest of maize and other crops in the Americas. Studies suggest that modern varieties of maize lost some of their natural defense mechanisms against herbivores during domestication and agricultural selection. In the present study, we evaluated the attraction, feeding preference (host fidelity and consumption rate), and performance of S. frugiperda larvae reared on hybrid (Pioneer P4063W) and landrace (Tuxpeño) varieties of maize. We also evaluated the damage caused by S. frugiperda to Pioneer and Tuxpeño maize plants in the field. We found that fifth-instar larvae were more attracted to Pioneer plants than to Tuxpeño plants in a Y-tube olfactometer. Additionally, the fall armyworm larvae showed more fidelity to Pioneer leaves than to Tuxpeño leaves. However, the larval consumption rate was similar for both types of maize plants. The life cycle of S. frugiperda was significantly longer when the larvae were reared on Tuxpeño leaves than on Pioneer leaves. In the field, the Pioneer variety was infested with more S. frugiperda larvae than the Tuxpeño variety. Thus, our results provide evidence that modern varieties of maize may have lost some of their defensive traits during selective breeding.

KEYWORDS:

development; fall armyworm; host searching; landrace; maize

PMID:
26802116
DOI:
10.1093/ee/nvv229
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center