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Calcif Tissue Int. 2016 Jun;98(6):609-18. doi: 10.1007/s00223-016-0108-8. Epub 2016 Jan 22.

Stanozolol Decreases Bone Turnover Markers, Increases Mineralization, and Alters Femoral Geometry in Male Rats.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology, School of Pharmacy and Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology, University of Granada, Campus universitario de Cartuja s/n, 18071, Granada, Spain. enebot@ugr.es.
2
Department of Pathophysiology and Allergy Research, Center for Pathophysiology, Infectiology and Immunology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. enebot@ugr.es.
3
Department of Physiology, School of Pharmacy and Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology, University of Granada, Campus universitario de Cartuja s/n, 18071, Granada, Spain.
4
Department of Public and Occupational Health, EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Physical Education, Faculty of Education Sciences, University of Cádiz, Cádiz, Spain.
6
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Physiology, Pathophysiology, and Biophysics, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria.
7
Andaluzian Sport Medicine Centre, San Juan de Dios Universitary Hospital, Granada, Spain.
8
Department of Pathophysiology and Allergy Research, Center for Pathophysiology, Infectiology and Immunology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Abstract

Stanozonol (ST) is a synthetic derivative of testosterone; it has anabolic/androgenic activity, increasing both the turnover of trabecular bone and the endocortical apposition of bone. The present study aimed to examine the effects of ST on bone status in rats by bone mineral content, markers of formation and resorption, bone density, and structural and microarchitectural parameters. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into two experimental groups corresponding to placebo or ST administration, which consisted of weekly intramuscular injections of 10 mg/kg body weight of ST. Plasma parameters were analyzed by immunoassay. Bone mineral content was determined by spectrophotometry. Bone mineral density (BMD) and structural parameters were measured by peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and trabecular and cortical microarchitecture by micro-computed tomography. Plasma Ca, Mg, and alkaline phosphatase were higher, and urinary Ca excretion, corticosterone, and testosterone concentrations lower in the ST group. Femur Ca content was higher and P content was lower in the ST, whereas osteocalcin, aminoterminal propeptides of type I procollagen, and C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen were lower. Total cross-sectional, trabecular, and cortical/subcortical areas were lower in the ST. No differences were observed on BMD and area parameters of the diaphysis as well as on trabecular and cortical microarchitecture. The use of ST increases bone mineralization, ash percentage, and Ca and Mg content in femur. In spite of an absence of changes in BMD, geometric metaphyseal changes were observed. We conclude that ST alters bone geometry, leads to low bone turnover, and thus may impair bone quality.

KEYWORDS:

Bone mineral content; Bone mineral density; Bone properties; Stanozolol; pQCT; μCT

PMID:
26801156
DOI:
10.1007/s00223-016-0108-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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