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Science. 2016 Jan 22;351(6271):379-84. doi: 10.1126/science.aad3839.

Oligodendrocyte precursors migrate along vasculature in the developing nervous system.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
2
Departments of Pharmacology and Neuroscience, University of California at San Diego (UCSD), San Diego, CA 92093, USA.
3
Department of Neurosciences, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA.
4
Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
5
Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Department of Urology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA. Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC 27710, USA.
6
Department of Neurology, UCSF, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
7
Department of Pediatrics, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. Department of Neurology, UCSF, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. Division of Neonatology, UCSF, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. Newborn Brain Research Institute, UCSF, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. stephen.fancy@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

Oligodendrocytes myelinate axons in the central nervous system and develop from oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) that must first migrate extensively during brain and spinal cord development. We show that OPCs require the vasculature as a physical substrate for migration. We observed that OPCs of the embryonic mouse brain and spinal cord, as well as the human cortex, emerge from progenitor domains and associate with the abluminal endothelial surface of nearby blood vessels. Migrating OPCs crawl along and jump between vessels. OPC migration in vivo was disrupted in mice with defective vascular architecture but was normal in mice lacking pericytes. Thus, physical interactions with the vascular endothelium are required for OPC migration. We identify Wnt-Cxcr4 (chemokine receptor 4) signaling in regulation of OPC-endothelial interactions and propose that this signaling coordinates OPC migration with differentiation.

PMID:
26798014
PMCID:
PMC5472053
DOI:
10.1126/science.aad3839
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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