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AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2016 Jun;37(6):1023-9. doi: 10.3174/ajnr.A4665. Epub 2016 Jan 21.

Clinical Feasibility of Synthetic MRI in Multiple Sclerosis: A Diagnostic and Volumetric Validation Study.

Author information

1
From the Departments of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (T.G., M.U., F.H., L.E.N., S.S., J.B., Y.F., P.A., M.K.-W.) Departments of Radiology (T.G., F.H., C.C., S.S., Y.F., P.A., M.K.-W) tobias.granberg@ki.se.
2
From the Departments of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (T.G., M.U., F.H., L.E.N., S.S., J.B., Y.F., P.A., M.K.-W.) Diagnostic Medical Physics (M.U., L.E.N., J.B.).
3
From the Departments of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (T.G., M.U., F.H., L.E.N., S.S., J.B., Y.F., P.A., M.K.-W.) Departments of Radiology (T.G., F.H., C.C., S.S., Y.F., P.A., M.K.-W).
4
Departments of Radiology (T.G., F.H., C.C., S.S., Y.F., P.A., M.K.-W).
5
Clinical Neuroscience (S.F.), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Neurology (S.F.), Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Quantitative MR imaging techniques are gaining interest as methods of reducing acquisition times while additionally providing robust measurements. This study aimed to implement a synthetic MR imaging method on a new scanner type and to compare its diagnostic accuracy and volumetry with conventional MR imaging in patients with MS and controls.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Twenty patients with MS and 20 healthy controls were enrolled after ethics approval and written informed consent. Synthetic MR imaging was implemented on a Siemens 3T scanner. Comparable conventional and synthetic proton-density-, T1-, and T2-weighted, and FLAIR images were acquired. Diagnostic accuracy, lesion detection, and artifacts were assessed by blinded neuroradiologic evaluation, and contrast-to-noise ratios, by manual tracing. Volumetry was performed with synthetic MR imaging, FreeSurfer, FMRIB Software Library, and Statistical Parametric Mapping. Repeatability was quantified by using the coefficient of variance.

RESULTS:

Synthetic proton-density-, T1-, and T2-weighted images were of sufficient or good quality and were acquired in 7% less time than with conventional MR imaging. Synthetic FLAIR images were degraded by artifacts. Lesion counts and volumes were higher in synthetic MR imaging due to differences in the contrast of dirty-appearing WM but did not affect the radiologic diagnostic classification or lesion topography (P = .50-.77). Synthetic MR imaging provided segmentations with the shortest processing time (16 seconds) and the lowest repeatability error for brain volume (0.14%), intracranial volume (0.12%), brain parenchymal fraction (0.14%), and GM fraction (0.56%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Synthetic MR imaging can be an alternative to conventional MR imaging for generating diagnostic proton-density-, T1-, and T2-weighted images in patients with MS and controls while additionally delivering fast and robust volumetric measurements suitable for MS studies.

PMID:
26797137
DOI:
10.3174/ajnr.A4665
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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