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J Consult Clin Psychol. 2016 May;84(5):402-14. doi: 10.1037/ccp0000077. Epub 2016 Jan 21.

Reducing eating disorder onset in a very high risk sample with significant comorbid depression: A randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Stanford Medical Center.
2
Department of Psychology, Washington University in St. Louis.
3
Department of Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara.
4
Department of Psychology, College of William & Mary.
5
Department of Cardiology, Washington University School of Medicine.
6
Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie, Technische Universit├Ąt Dresden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Eating disorders (EDs) are serious problems among college-age women and may be preventable. An indicated online eating disorder (ED) intervention, designed to reduce ED and comorbid pathology, was evaluated.

METHOD:

206 women (M age = 20 ┬▒ 1.8 years; 51% White/Caucasian, 11% African American, 10% Hispanic, 21% Asian/Asian American, 7% other) at very high risk for ED onset (i.e., with high weight/shape concerns plus a history of being teased, current or lifetime depression, and/or nonclinical levels of compensatory behaviors) were randomized to a 10-week, Internet-based, cognitive-behavioral intervention or waitlist control. Assessments included the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE, to assess ED onset), EDE-Questionnaire, Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders, and Beck Depression Inventory-II.

RESULTS:

ED attitudes and behaviors improved more in the intervention than control group (p = .02, d = 0.31); although ED onset rate was 27% lower, this difference was not significant (p = .28, NNT = 15). In the subgroup with highest shape concerns, ED onset rate was significantly lower in the intervention than control group (20% vs. 42%, p = .025, NNT = 5). For the 27 individuals with depression at baseline, depressive symptomatology improved more in the intervention than control group (p = .016, d = 0.96); although ED onset rate was lower in the intervention than control group, this difference was not significant (25% vs. 57%, NNT = 4).

CONCLUSIONS:

An inexpensive, easily disseminated intervention might reduce ED onset among those at highest risk. Low adoption rates need to be addressed in future research.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00934583.

PMID:
26795936
PMCID:
PMC4836995
DOI:
10.1037/ccp0000077
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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