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Dig Liver Dis. 2016 Apr;48(4):353-9. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2015.12.009. Epub 2015 Dec 29.

Proton pump inhibitor therapy and its association with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis incidence and mortality: A meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu Province, China.
2
Department of Gastroenterology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, Jiangsu Province, China. Electronic address: linlin9100@aliyun.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous meta-analyses reported proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy is associated with increased incidence of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) in cirrhotic patients. However, this conclusion was based on case-control studies. Moreover, the association between PPI use and mortality of SBP has not yet been confirmed.

AIMS:

To evaluate the association between PPI use and SBP incidence and mortality using case-control and cohort studies.

METHODS:

We searched Medline, Embase and Web of Knowledge for relevant articles published up to January 2015. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model.

RESULTS:

A total of 10 case-control and six cohort studies involving 8145 patients were analyzed. The overall analysis indicated that PPI use was associated with SBP (OR=2.11, 95% CI: 1.46-3.06). The association was limited in case-control studies (OR=2.97, 95% CI: 2.06-4.26) but not in cohort studies (OR=1.18, 95% CI: 0.99-1.14). PPI therapy was not associated with mortality during hospitalization or within 30 days after SBP (OR=1.54, 95% CI: 0.92-2.59).

CONCLUSIONS:

We could not establish causality that PPI use increases the incidence or mortality of SBP.

KEYWORDS:

Bacterial infections; Liver cirrhosis; Meta-analysis; Proton pump inhibitors

PMID:
26795544
DOI:
10.1016/j.dld.2015.12.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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