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Patient Educ Couns. 2016 Jun;99(6):1038-45. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2015.12.017. Epub 2015 Dec 28.

Assessing the influence of health literacy on health information behaviors: A multi-domain skills-based approach.

Author information

1
The Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University, 31, Nanyang Link, Singapore 637718, Singapore. Electronic address: Ratnadeep.Suri@gmail.com.
2
The Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University, 31, Nanyang Link, Singapore 637718, Singapore. Electronic address: Asmajid@ntu.edu.sg.
3
The Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University, 31, Nanyang Link, Singapore 637718, Singapore. Electronic address: Ykchang@ntu.edu.sg.
4
The Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University, 31, Nanyang Link, Singapore 637718, Singapore. Electronic address: sfoo@ntu.edu.sg.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between five domain-specific skills of health literacy: Find Health Information (FHI), Appraise Health Information (AHI), Understand Health Information to act (UHI), Actively Manage One's Health (AMH), and E-health literacy (e-Heals), and health information seeking behaviors and three categories of health outcomes.

METHODS:

A survey was implemented and data was collected from 1062 college going adults and analyzed using bivariate tests and multiple regression analysis.

RESULTS:

Among the five domain-specific Health Literacy skills, AHI and e-Heals were significantly associated with the use of traditional sources and the Internet for healthcare information respectively. Similarly and AMH and e-Heals were significantly associated with the use of traditional sources and the Internet for health lifestyle information respectively. Lastly AHI, AMH and e-Heals were significantly associated with the three categories of outcomes, and AFH was significantly associated with cognitive and instrumental outcomes, but not doctor-patient communication outcomes.

CONCLUSION:

Consumers' ability to use different health sources for both healthcare and health lifestyle information, and the three categories of health outcomes are associated with different domain-specific health literacy skills.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

Health literacy initiatives may be improved by focusing on clients to develop domain-specific skills that increase the likelihood of using health information sources and accrue benefits.

KEYWORDS:

E-health literacy; Health information seeking; Health literacy; Singapore

PMID:
26794667
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2015.12.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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