Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Pediatr. 2016 Apr;171:116-21. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.12.044. Epub 2016 Jan 13.

Predictors of Antimicrobial Resistance among Pathogens Causing Urinary Tract Infection in Children.

Author information

1
Division of General Academic Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA.
2
Division of General Pediatrics, Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA.
3
Department of Biostatistics, Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.
4
Department of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN.
5
National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.
6
Department of Pediatrics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine which children with urinary tract infection are likely to have pathogens resistant to narrow-spectrum antimicrobials.

STUDY DESIGN:

Children, 2-71 months of age (n = 769) enrolled in the Randomized Intervention for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux or Careful Urinary Tract Infection Evaluation studies were included. We used logistic regression models to test the associations between demographic and clinical characteristics and resistance to narrow-spectrum antimicrobials.

RESULTS:

Of the included patients, 91% were female and 76% had vesicoureteral reflux. The risk of resistance to narrow-spectrum antibiotics in uncircumcised males was approximately 3 times that of females (OR 3.1; 95% CI 1.4-6.7); in children with bladder bowel dysfunction, the risk was 2 times that of children with normal function (OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.2-4.1). Children who had received 1 course of antibiotics during the past 6 months also had higher odds of harboring resistant organisms (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.1-2.3). Hispanic children had higher odds of harboring pathogens resistant to some narrow-spectrum antimicrobials.

CONCLUSIONS:

Uncircumcised males, Hispanic children, children with bladder bowel dysfunction, and children who received 1 course of antibiotics in the past 6 months were more likely to have a urinary tract infection caused by pathogens resistant to 1 or more narrow-spectrum antimicrobials.

PMID:
26794472
PMCID:
PMC4808618
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.12.044
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center