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J Vasc Surg. 2016 Apr;63(4):930-42. doi: 10.1016/j.jvs.2015.10.095. Epub 2016 Jan 11.

Fenestrated and branched endovascular aneurysm repair outcomes for type II and III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms.

Author information

1
Department of Vascular Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio. Electronic address: eagletm@ccf.org.
2
Department of Vascular Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) repair remains a challenging clinical pathology. Endovascular technology, in particular the evolution of fenestrated and branched (F/B) endografts used in endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has provided a less invasive method of treating these complex aneurysms. This study evaluated the technical and clinical outcomes of F/B-EVAR for extensive type II and III TAAA.

METHODS:

Data from 354 high-risk patients enrolled in a physician-sponsored investigational device exemption trial (2004-2013) undergoing F/B-EVAR for type II and III TAAA were evaluated. Technical success, perioperative clinical outcomes, and midterm outcomes (36 months) for branch patency, reintervention, aneurysm-related death, and all-cause mortality were analyzed. Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation and were assessed using Kaplan-Meier, univariate, and multivariate analysis.

RESULTS:

F/B-EVARs incorporating 1305 fenestration/branches were implanted with 96% of target vessels successfully stented. Completion aortography showed 2.8% patients had a type I or III endoleak. Procedure duration (6.0 ± 1.7 vs 5.5 ± 1.6 hours; P < .01) and hospital stay (13.1 ± 10.1 vs 10.2 ± 7.4 days; P < .01) were longer for type II TAAA. Perioperative mortality was greater in type II repairs (7.0% vs 3.5%; P < .001). Permanent spinal cord ischemia occurred in 4% and renal failure requiring hemodialysis occurred in 2.8% of patients. Twenty-seven branches (7.6%) required reintervention for stenosis or occlusion; and celiac artery, superior mesenteric artery, and renal artery secondary patency at 36 months was 96% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.93-0.99), 98% (95% CI, 0.97-1.0), and 98% (95% CI, 0.96-1.0), respectively. Eighty endoleak repairs were performed in 67 patients, including 55 branch-related endoleaks, 4 type Ia, 5 type Ib, and 15 type II endoleaks. At 36 months, freedom from aneurysm-related death was 91% (95% CI, 0.88-0.95), and freedom from all-cause mortality was 57% (95% CI, 0.50-0.63). The treatment of type II TAAA (P < .01), age (P < .01), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (P < .05) negatively affected survival.

CONCLUSIONS:

F/B-EVAR is a robust treatment option for patients at increased risk for conventional repair of extensive TAAAs. Technical success and branch patency are excellent, but some patients will require reintervention for branch-related endoleak. Aneurysm extent portends a higher risk of perioperative and long-term morbidity and mortality. Additional efforts are needed to improve outcomes and understand the utility of this treatment option in the general TAAA population.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00583050.

Comment in

PMID:
26792544
DOI:
10.1016/j.jvs.2015.10.095
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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