Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Food Sci Technol. 2016 Jan;53(1):581-90. doi: 10.1007/s13197-015-2048-0. Epub 2015 Oct 1.

Characterization of bioactive agents in five types of marketed sprouts and comparison of their antihypertensive, antihyperlipidemic, and antidiabetic effects in fructose-loaded SHRs.

Author information

1
Institute of Agriculture, Academic Assembly, Shinshu University, 8304 Minamiminowa-Village, Nagano, 399-4598 Japan ; Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Faculty of Agriculture, Shinshu University, 8304 Minamiminowa-Village, Nagano, 399-4598 Japan ; Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Shinshu University, 8304 Minamiminowa-Village, Nagano, 399-4598 Japan.
2
Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Faculty of Agriculture, Shinshu University, 8304 Minamiminowa-Village, Nagano, 399-4598 Japan.
3
Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Shinshu University, 8304 Minamiminowa-Village, Nagano, 399-4598 Japan.
4
Saladcosmo Co., Ltd, 1-15 Sentanbayashi, Nakatsugawa, Gifu 509-9131 Japan.
5
Department of Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Pathogenesis and Disease Prevention, Shinshu University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 Japan.

Abstract

Hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes are important precursors of cardiovascular disease. Here, we evaluated the antihypertensive, antihyperlipidemic, and antidiabetic potential of five types of sprouts in fructose-loaded spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Powdered sprouts (PSs) were produced from mung bean, broccoli, radish, and buckwheat sprouts and germinated soybeans by lyophilization. The PSs were analyzed for nutritional composition and bioactive agents (γ-aminobutyric acid [GABA], coenzyme Q10 [CoQ10], rutin, and myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate [IP6]) and functionally tested in SHRs given water containing 25 % fructose and diets containing 30 % PS for 46 days. All PSs were nutritionally rich in protein and dietary fiber. CoQ10, GABA/rutin, and GABA/IP6 were abundant in broccoli, buckwheat, and germinated soybean PSs, respectively. Mung bean, broccoli, and buckwheat PSs caused significant reductions in heart rates and/or serum triglycerides. Mung bean PS also significantly reduced serum total cholesterol. These data supported the antihypertensive and antihyperlipidemic potential of mung bean, broccoli, and buckwheat sprouts.

KEYWORDS:

Antihyperlipidemia; Antihypertension; Broccoli; Buckwheat; Fructose-loaded SHR; Mung bean; Sprouts

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center