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Int J Mol Sci. 2016 Jan 14;17(1). pii: E100. doi: 10.3390/ijms17010100.

Iron in Multiple Sclerosis and Its Noninvasive Imaging with Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10044, USA. cas2050@med.cornell.edu.
2
Department of Neurology, Yale School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, USA. cas2050@med.cornell.edu.
3
Department of Neurology, Yale School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, USA. david.pitt@yale.edu.
4
Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10044, USA. yw233@cornell.edu.
5
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. yw233@cornell.edu.

Abstract

Iron is considered to play a key role in the development and progression of Multiple Sclerosis (MS). In particular, iron that accumulates in myeloid cells after the blood-brain barrier (BBB) seals may contribute to chronic inflammation, oxidative stress and eventually neurodegeneration. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a well-established tool for the non-invasive study of MS. In recent years, an advanced MRI method, quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), has made it possible to study brain iron through in vivo imaging. Moreover, immunohistochemical investigations have helped defining the lesional and cellular distribution of iron in MS brain tissue. Imaging studies in MS patients and of brain tissue combined with histological studies have provided important insights into the role of iron in inflammation and neurodegeneration in MS.

KEYWORDS:

MRI; MS lesion; deep grey matter (DGM); quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM)

PMID:
26784172
PMCID:
PMC4730342
DOI:
10.3390/ijms17010100
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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