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Int Health. 2016 Jan;8(1):44-52. doi: 10.1093/inthealth/ihv075.

Prevalence of violence in childhood and adolescence and the impact on educational outcomes: evidence from the 2013 Peruvian national survey on social relations.

Author information

1
Moray House School of Education, Holyrood Road, University of Edinburgh, Scotland EH8 8AQ debi.fry@ed.ac.uk.
2
Pontifical Catholic University of Peru, Av. Universitaria 1801, San Miguel, Lima 32, Peru.
3
Instituto Nacional de Estadística e Informática - INEI, Dirección Nacional de Censos y Encuestas, Av. Gral. Garzón 654-658, Jesús María Lima-Perú
4
Moray House School of Education, Holyrood Road, University of Edinburgh, Scotland EH8 8AQ.
5
UNICEF Peru, UNICEF Parque Meliton Porras 350 Miraflores, Lima, Perú
6
Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Populations (MIMP), Jr. Camana 616, Lima, Perú
7
College of Economics and Management, China Agricultural University, No. 17 Qinghuadong Road, Haidian District, Beijing, 100083, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study provides, for the first time, national population-based estimates describing violence during childhood and adolescence in Peru and the impact on educational outcomes.

METHODS:

A population-based school survey was conducted among children aged 9-11 (n=1587) and adolescents aged 12-17 (n=1489). The relationship between violence and educational outcomes were analysed using bivariate logistic regressions, controlling for potential confounding factors.

RESULTS:

The results show that psychological (75.6%) and physical violence (72.5%) at home were the most prevalent forms of violence experienced by adolescent girls. Adolescent boys reported experiencing similar levels of psychological violence from their peers (69.4%) and at home (68.1%). For the younger cohort, peer-to-peer psychological violence was reported more frequently among girls (70.6%) and boys (74.0%) than other forms of violence. Equal percentages of adolescent girls and boys reported experiencing sexual violence in their lifetime (42.0%). The relationship between violence experiences and educational outcomes varied by gender with strong associations between violence at home and failing a course or repeating a grade for girls and being expelled for boys. Sexual violence experienced by boys was associated with all negative educational outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS:

The relationship between violence in childhood and poorer educational outcomes is multi-faceted, potentially bi-directional, and manifests differently between genders. This research highlights the need for targeted research, policy and programming responses for prevention of violence.

KEYWORDS:

Educational outcomes; Peru; Prevalence; Schools; Violence against children

PMID:
26782352
DOI:
10.1093/inthealth/ihv075
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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