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Bull Cancer. 2016 Feb;103(2):190-8. doi: 10.1016/j.bulcan.2015.11.003. Epub 2016 Jan 15.

[Exposure to CT scans in childhood and long-term cancer risk: A review of epidemiological studies].

[Article in French]

Author information

1
Institut de radioprotection et de sûreté nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-Hom, SRBE, laboratoire d'épidémiologie, BP17, 92260 Fontenay-aux-Roses, France. Electronic address: helene.baysson@irsn.fr.
2
Institut de radioprotection et de sûreté nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-Hom, SRBE, laboratoire d'épidémiologie, BP17, 92260 Fontenay-aux-Roses, France.
3
Département de radiologie pédiatrique, hôpital Trousseau, 6, avenue du Docteur-Arnold-Netter, 75012 Paris, France.
4
Institut de radioprotection et de sûreté nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-Hom, SER, unité d'expertise en radioprotection médicale, BP 17, 92260 Fontenay-aux-Roses, France.

Abstract

Amongst medical exams requiring ionizing radiation, computed tomography (CT) scans are used more frequently, including in children. These CT examinations are associated with absorbed doses that are much higher than those associated with conventional radiology. In comparison to adults, children have a greater sensitivity to radiation and a longer life span with more years at cancer risks. Five epidemiological studies on cancer risks after CT scan exposure during childhood were published between 2012 and 2015. The results of these studies are consistent and show an increase of cancer risks in children who have been exposed to several CT scans. However, methodological limits due to indication bias, retrospective assessment of radiation exposure from CT scans and lack of statistical power are to be taken into consideration. International projects such as EPI-CT (Epidemiological study to quantify risks for pediatric computerized tomography and to optimize dose), with a focus on dosimetric reconstruction and minimization of bias will provide more precise results. In the meantime, available results reinforce the necessity of justification and optimization of doses.

KEYWORDS:

CT scans; Cancer; Children; Enfants; Epidemiology; Ionizing radiation; Rayonnements ionisants; Scanographie; Épidémiologie

PMID:
26782078
DOI:
10.1016/j.bulcan.2015.11.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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