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Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2016 Oct;294(4):681-8. doi: 10.1007/s00404-016-4008-y. Epub 2016 Jan 18.

Post-traumatic stress disorder following emergency peripartum hysterectomy.

Author information

1
Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, 13201 Bruce B. Downs Blvd, MDC 56, Tampa, FL, 33612, USA. delacruz@alumni.upenn.edu.
2
Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, 13201 Bruce B. Downs Blvd, MDC 56, Tampa, FL, 33612, USA.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, 13201 Bruce B. Downs Blvd, MDC 56, Tampa, FL, 33612, USA.
4
Baylor College of Medicine, 3701 Kirby Drive, Houston, TX, 77098, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Our objective was to explore if women who experience emergency peripartum hysterectomy (EPH), a type of severe maternal morbidity, are more likely to screen positive for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) compared to women who did not experience EPH.

METHODS:

Using a retrospective cohort design, women were sampled through online communities. Participants completed online screens for PTSD. Additionally, women provided sociodemographic, obstetric, psychiatric, and psychosocial information. We conducted bivariate and logistic regression analyses, then Monte Carlo simulation and propensity score matching to calculate the risk of screening positive for PTSD after EPH.

RESULTS:

74 exposed women (experienced EPH) and 335 non-exposed women (did not experience EPH) completed the survey. EPH survivors were nearly two times more likely to screen positive for PTSD (aOR: 1.90; 95 % CI: 1.57, 2.30), and nearly 2.5 times more likely to screen positive for PTSD at 6 months postpartum compared to women who were not EPH survivors (aOR: 2.46; 95 % CI: 1.92, 3.16).

CONCLUSION:

The association of EPH and PTSD was statistically significant, indicating a need for further research, and the potential need for support services for these women following childbirth.

KEYWORDS:

Emergency hysterectomy; Maternal mental health; Maternal morbidity; PTSD; Post-traumatic stress disorder

PMID:
26781263
DOI:
10.1007/s00404-016-4008-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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