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J Sleep Res. 2016 Jun;25(3):325-32. doi: 10.1111/jsr.12375. Epub 2016 Jan 18.

Short persistent sleep duration is associated with poor receptive vocabulary performance in middle childhood.

Seegers V1,2,3,4, Touchette E5,6, Dionne G5,7, Petit D8,9, Seguin JR9,10,11, Montplaisir J8,9, Vitaro F10,11, Falissard B1, Boivin M5,7,12, Tremblay RE10,12,13,14,15.

Author information

1
INSERM U669, Paris, France.
2
Structure Fédérative de Recherche du pôle Santé, SFR_ICAT, Angers, France.
3
DRCI Data management, CHU Angers, Angers, France.
4
UMR 892, University of Angers, 49 100, France.
5
Research Unit on Children's Psychosocial Maladjustment, Laval University, Laval, Canada.
6
Department of Psychoeducation, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, Canada.
7
Department of Psychology, Laval University, Laval, Canada.
8
Centre for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine, Sacré-Coeur Hospital, Montreal, Canada.
9
Department of Psychiatry, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada.
10
Research Unit on Children's Psychosocial Maladjustment, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada.
11
School of Psychoeducation, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada.
12
Institute of Genetic, Neurobiological and Social Foundations of Child Development, Tomsk State University, Russian Federation.
13
CHU Ste-Justine Research Centre, Montreal, Canada.
14
Departments of Paediatrics and Psychology, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada.
15
School of Public Health and Population Sciences, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine whether short sleep duration is associated with poor receptive vocabulary at age 10 years. In the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development, parents reported their children's nocturnal sleep duration annually from ages 2.5 to 10 years, and children were assessed for receptive vocabulary using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised (PPVT-R) at ages 4 and 10 years. Groups with distinct nocturnal sleep duration trajectories were identified and the relationships between sleep trajectories and poor PPVT-R performance were characterized. In all, 1192 children with available sleep duration and PPVT-R data participated in this epidemiological study. We identified four longitudinal nocturnal sleep trajectories: short persistent sleepers (n = 72, 6.0%), short increasing sleepers (n = 47, 3.9%), 10-h sleepers (n = 628, 52.7%) and 11-h sleepers (n = 445, 37.3%). In all, 14.8% of the children showed poor PPVT-R performance at age 10 years. Nocturnal sleep trajectories and poor PPVT-R performance at age 10 were associated significantly (P = 0.003). After adjusting for baseline receptive vocabulary performance at age 4 and other potential confounding variables, logistic regression analyses suggest that, compared to 11-h sleepers, the odds ratio of presenting poor receptive vocabulary at age 10 was 2.67 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.24-5.74, P = 0.012] for short persistent sleepers and 1.66 (95% CI: 1.06-2.59, P = 0.026) for 10-h sleepers. These results corroborate previous findings in early childhood, and indicate that short sleep duration is associated with poor receptive vocabulary during middle childhood.

KEYWORDS:

childhood; development; language; sleep duration; trajectories; vocabulary

PMID:
26781184
DOI:
10.1111/jsr.12375
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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