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Acta Oncol. 2016;55 Suppl 1:91-7. doi: 10.3109/0284186X.2015.1115123. Epub 2016 Jan 19.

Trends in tumors in the central nervous system in elderly in Denmark, 2008-2012.

Author information

1
a Department of Oncology , Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark , Odense , Denmark ;
2
b Department of Neurosurgery , Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark , Odense , Denmark ;
3
c Department of Radiology , Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark , Odense , Denmark ;
4
d Department of Pathology , Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark , Odense , Denmark ;
5
e The Danish Twin Registry, University of Southern Denmark , Denmark.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Tumors in the central nervous system (CNS) comprise a heterogeneous group of tumors with different treatment strategies and prognoses. Current treatment regimens are based on studies on patients mainly younger than 70 years. The aim of the present study was to analyze and describe trends in incidence, mortality, prevalence, and relative survival in Denmark from 1980 to 2012 focusing on patients older than 70 years.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

Tumors in the CNS were defined as ICD-10 codes C70-72, D32-33 and D42-43. Data with comparable data on cancer incidence, mortality, prevalence and relative survival derived from the NORDCAN database were delivered from the Danish Cancer Registry and the Danish Cause of Death Registry with follow-up for death or emigration until the end of 2013.

RESULTS:

During the period 1980-2012 the number of patients with CNS tumors increased from 603 to 1378 patients. The increase is seen mainly in the elderly patients, and especially in women aged 84-89 and 90 + at the time of diagnosis. During the same time period, the mortality rates increased within all age groups, most significantly in patients aged 70 years or older. This may reflect an increased focus on and identification of these patients. Noteworthy; the number of patients living with a CNS tumor increased from 2952 in 1980 to 12 147 patients in 2010.

CONCLUSION:

This study suggests that the current treatment strategies in general may have improved survival in patients with CNS tumors, but in order to improve survival further in the increasing group of elderly patients more knowledge about treatment of these patients is needed.

PMID:
26781160
DOI:
10.3109/0284186X.2015.1115123
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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