Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Hum Genet. 2016 Mar;135(3):309-26. doi: 10.1007/s00439-015-1620-z. Epub 2016 Jan 18.

Resolving the ancestry of Austronesian-speaking populations.

Author information

1
Department of Biology, CBMA (Centre of Molecular and Environmental Biology), University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057, Braga, Portugal.
2
IPATIMUP (Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology of the University of Porto), Rua Dr. Roberto Frias s/n, 4200-465, Porto, Portugal.
3
Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK.
4
Molecular Anthropology and Transfusion Medicine Research Laboratory, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei City, 10449, Taiwan.
5
Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS), School of Health Sciences, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057, Braga, Portugal.
6
ICVS/3B's-PT Government Associate Laboratory, Braga, Guimarães, Portugal.
7
I3S - Institute for Research Innovation in Health, University of Porto, 4200-135, Porto, Portugal.
8
Centre for Global Archaeological Research, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), 11800, Penang, Malaysia.
9
Department of Applied Social Studies, University of Winchester, Sparkford Road, Winchester, SO22 4NR, UK.
10
Department of Biological Sciences, School of Applied Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield, HD1 3DH, UK.
11
ICBAS - Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar, University of Porto, 4050-313, Porto, Portugal.
12
Centre for Global Health Research, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, EH8 9AG, Scotland, UK.
13
Synpromics Ltd, Nine Edinburgh Bioquarter, Edinburgh, EH16 4UX, UK.
14
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, National Taiwan University, Roosevelt Rd., Taipei, 10617, Taiwan.
15
Faculty of Sciences, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, s/n, 4169-007, Porto, Portugal.
16
Department of Statistics, University of Glasgow, 15 University Gardens, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, UK.
17
Department of Archaeology and Natural History, College of Asia and the Pacific, The Australian National University, Acton, Canberra, ACT, 2601, Australia.
18
MRC Human Genetics Unit, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh, EH4 2XU, Scotland.
19
DNA Diagnostic Laboratory (LDD), State University of Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rua São Francisco Xavier, Rio de Janeiro, 20550-900, Brazil.
20
Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Al. Prof. Hernâni Monteiro, 4200-319, Porto, Portugal.
21
Institute of Human Sciences, School of Anthropology, University of Oxford, The Pauling Centre, 58a Banbury Road, Oxford, OX2 6QS, UK.
22
Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK. m.b.richards@hud.ac.uk.
23
Department of Biological Sciences, School of Applied Sciences, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield, HD1 3DH, UK. m.b.richards@hud.ac.uk.

Abstract

There are two very different interpretations of the prehistory of Island Southeast Asia (ISEA), with genetic evidence invoked in support of both. The "out-of-Taiwan" model proposes a major Late Holocene expansion of Neolithic Austronesian speakers from Taiwan. An alternative, proposing that Late Glacial/postglacial sea-level rises triggered largely autochthonous dispersals, accounts for some otherwise enigmatic genetic patterns, but fails to explain the Austronesian language dispersal. Combining mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), Y-chromosome and genome-wide data, we performed the most comprehensive analysis of the region to date, obtaining highly consistent results across all three systems and allowing us to reconcile the models. We infer a primarily common ancestry for Taiwan/ISEA populations established before the Neolithic, but also detected clear signals of two minor Late Holocene migrations, probably representing Neolithic input from both Mainland Southeast Asia and South China, via Taiwan. This latter may therefore have mediated the Austronesian language dispersal, implying small-scale migration and language shift rather than large-scale expansion.

PMID:
26781090
PMCID:
PMC4757630
DOI:
10.1007/s00439-015-1620-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center