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Brain Behav Immun. 2016 Mar;53:262-272. doi: 10.1016/j.bbi.2016.01.012. Epub 2016 Jan 14.

Combined effects of social stress and liver fluke infection in a mouse model.

Author information

1
The Federal Research Center Institute of Cytology and Genetics of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia. Electronic address: avgust@bionet.nsc.ru.
2
N.N. Vorozhtsov Novosibirsk Institute of Organic Chemistry of the Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Science, Novosibirsk, Russia.
3
Scientific Research Institute of Physiology & Basic Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia.
4
The Federal Research Center Institute of Cytology and Genetics of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia.
5
The Federal Research Center Institute of Cytology and Genetics of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia; Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics of Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia.

Abstract

The effects of two influences, social stress and acute opisthorchiasis, were investigated in inbred C57BL/6J male mice. In the model of social stress, mice were repeatedly attacked and defeated by aggressive outbred ICR male mice and were in continuous sensory contact with an aggressive conspecific mouse in their home cage for 20 days. Acute opisthorchiasis was provoked by invasion of Opisthorchis felineus (50 larvae per animal) on the fourth day after the social stress was induced. Simultaneous action of both factors caused the hypertrophy of adrenal glands, as well as elevated the activity of cathepsins B and L in the spleen. This effect on the activity of the cysteine proteases in the hippocampus and hypothalamus following O. felineus invasion was the predominant result of simultaneous action with social stress. Acute opisthorchiasis, social stress, and their combination caused an increase in the level of blood IL-6 in approximately 30% of the animals. Social stress induced a more pronounced effect on mouse plus-maze behavior than O. felineus invasion. Our results suggest a more severe negative effect of the simultaneous influence of both factors on most of the parameters that were investigated.

KEYWORDS:

Brain; Cathepsins B and L; Corticosterone; IL-6; Liver; Opisthorchis felineus; Plus-maze test; Social defeat stress; Spleen

PMID:
26778779
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbi.2016.01.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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