Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Crit Rev Oncol Hematol. 2016 Mar;99:158-69. doi: 10.1016/j.critrevonc.2015.12.014. Epub 2015 Dec 29.

18F-FLT PET imaging of cellular proliferation in pancreatic cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom. Electronic address: angela.lamarca@christie.nhs.uk.
2
University of Manchester Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre (WMIC), Manchester, United Kingdom.
3
Department of Radiology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom.
4
Department of Medical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom; University of Manchester, Institute of Cancer Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Department of Medical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom.
5
Department of Medical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom.
6
University of Manchester Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre (WMIC), Manchester, United Kingdom; Imanova Centre for Imaging Sciences, Imperial College Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London W12 0NN, United Kingdom.
7
Department of Medical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom; University of Manchester, Institute of Cancer Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Department of Medical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom. Electronic address: juan.valle@manchester.ac.uk.

Abstract

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is known for its poor prognosis. Since the development of computerized tomography, magnetic resonance and endoscopic ultrasound, novel imaging techniques have struggled to get established in the management of patients diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma for several reasons. Thus, imaging assessment of pancreatic cancer remains a field with scope for further improvement. In contrast to cross-sectional anatomical imaging methods, molecular imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) can provide information on tumour function. Particularly, tumour proliferation may be assessed by measurement of intracellular thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) activity level using thymidine analogues radiolabelled with a positron emitter for use with PET. This approach, has been widely explored with [(18)F]-fluoro-3'-deoxy-3'-L-fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT) PET. This manuscript reviews the rationale and physiology behind (18)F-FLT PET imaging, with special focus on pancreatic cancer and other gastrointestinal malignancies. Potential benefit and challenges of this imaging technique for diagnosis, staging and assessment of treatment response in abdominal malignancies are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

(18)F-FLT PET; Adenocarcinoma; Cancer; Pancreatic cancer; Proliferation; Thymidine

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center