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Auris Nasus Larynx. 2016 Oct;43(5):518-23. doi: 10.1016/j.anl.2015.12.010. Epub 2016 Jan 14.

Crosshatching incision technique in septoplasty: Experimental outcomes under actual surgical settings.

Author information

1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: profsookim@gmail.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

In previous experiments, the crosshatching incision has been shown to be an effective method for the correction of cartilaginous deviations. Although the settings of the experiments were different from that of septoplasty, the crosshatching incision has been considered a useful method for septoplasty. Therefore, we attempted to determine the efficacy of the crosshatching incision technique under actual septoplasty surgical settings.

METHODS:

Commercial pig ear cartilages were used for the following experiments: firstly, the crosshatching incision was performed with the cartilage in a partially fixed state (in order to approximate caudal and dorsal fixation of septal cartilage); secondly, for the purpose of approximating L-strut preservation in septoplasty, the crosshatching incision was performed while excluding a marginal area of 1cm on any two contiguous borders. After the experiments, the change of curvature was assessed.

RESULTS:

Under fixation of two contiguous borders, the curvature of the cartilage did not straighten after using the crosshatching incision. Incisions preserving the L-strut were not effective either. Furthermore, unpredicted deviation and splitting of the cartilage developed after the crosshatching incision.

CONCLUSIONS:

Under actual surgical settings, the crosshatching incision was ineffective for the correction of septal deviation. Therefore, usefulness of the crosshatching incision needs to be re-evaluated.

KEYWORDS:

Animal experimentation; Cartilage; Nasal septum; Reconstructive surgical procedures; Surgery

PMID:
26778240
DOI:
10.1016/j.anl.2015.12.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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