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J Biosci Bioeng. 2016 Jul;122(1):79-84. doi: 10.1016/j.jbiosc.2015.12.008. Epub 2016 Jan 6.

Quantification of coffee blends for authentication of Asian palm civet coffee (Kopi Luwak) via metabolomics: A proof of concept.

Author information

1
Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan; Division of Metabolomics, Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan.
2
Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.
3
Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute, Jalan PB Sudirman 90, Jember East Java 68118, Indonesia.
4
Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. Electronic address: fukusaki@bio.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp.

Abstract

Asian palm civet coffee (Kopi Luwak), an animal-digested coffee with an exotic feature, carries a notorious reputation of being the rarest and most expensive coffee beverage in the world. Considering that illegal mixture of cheap coffee into civet coffee is a growing concern among consumers, we evaluated the use of metabolomics approach and orthogonal projection to latent structures (OPLS) prediction technique to quantify the degree of coffee adulteration. Two prediction sets, consisting of certified and commercial coffee, were made from a blend of civet and regular coffee with eleven mixing percentages. The prediction model exhibited accurate estimation of coffee blend percentage thus, successfully validating the prediction and quantification of the mixing composition of known-unknown samples. This work highlighted proof of concept of metabolomics application to predict degree of coffee adulteration by determining the civet coffee fraction in blends.

KEYWORDS:

Asian palm civet coffee; Coffee blend; Kopi Luwak; Metabolomics; Orthogonal projection to latent structures; Prediction model

PMID:
26777237
DOI:
10.1016/j.jbiosc.2015.12.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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