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Brain Res. 2016 Mar 15;1635:1-11. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2016.01.018. Epub 2016 Jan 15.

2100-MHz electromagnetic fields have different effects on visual evoked potentials and oxidant/antioxidant status depending on exposure duration.

Author information

1
Akdeniz University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biophysics, Turkey.
2
Mugla Sıtkı Kocman University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biophysics, Turkey.
3
Akdeniz University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Histology and Embryology, Turkey.
4
Akdeniz University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Turkey.
5
Akdeniz University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Physiology, Turkey.
6
Akdeniz University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biophysics, Turkey. Electronic address: pakkiraz@akdeniz.edu.tr.

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the duration effects of 2100-MHz electromagnetic field (EMF) on visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and to assess lipid peroxidation (LPO), nitric oxide (NO) production and antioxidant status of EMF exposed rats. Rats were randomized to following groups: Sham rats (S1 and S10) and rats exposed to 2100-MHz EMF (E1 and E10) for 2h/day for 1 or 10 weeks, respectively. At the end of experimental periods, VEPs were recorded under anesthesia. Brain thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) levels were significantly decreased in the E1 whereas increased in the E10 compared with their control groups. While brain catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities and NO and glutathione (GSH) levels were significantly increased in the E1, reduction of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was detected in the same group compared with the S1. Conversely, decreased CAT, GSH-Px activities and NO levels were observed in the E10 compared with the S10. Latencies of all VEP components were shortened in the E1 compared with the S1, whereas latencies of all VEP components, except P1, were prolonged in the E10 compared with the S10. There was a positive correlation between all VEP latencies and brain TBARS and 4-HNE values. Consequently, it could be concluded that different effects of EMFs on VEPs depend on exposure duration. In addition, our results indicated that short-term EMF could provide protective effects, while long-term EMF could have an adverse effect on VEPs and oxidant/antioxidant status.

KEYWORDS:

Antioxidant; Electromagnetic fields; Nitric oxide; Oxidative stress; Visual evoked potentials

PMID:
26776477
DOI:
10.1016/j.brainres.2016.01.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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