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Trends Neurosci. 2016 Feb;39(2):74-85. doi: 10.1016/j.tins.2015.12.007. Epub 2016 Jan 15.

Defining Auditory-Visual Objects: Behavioral Tests and Physiological Mechanisms.

Author information

1
University College London (UCL) Ear Institute, 332 Gray's Inn Road, London, WC1X 8EE, UK. Electronic address: j.bizley@ucl.ac.uk.
2
Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences, University of Washington, 1715 NE Columbia Road, Portage Bay Building, Box 357988, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.
3
Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences, University of Washington, 1715 NE Columbia Road, Portage Bay Building, Box 357988, Seattle, WA 98195, USA; Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, 1417 NE 42nd Street, Eagleson Hall, Box 354875, Seattle, WA 98105, USA. Electronic address: akclee@uw.edu.

Abstract

Crossmodal integration is a term applicable to many phenomena in which one sensory modality influences task performance or perception in another sensory modality. We distinguish the term binding as one that should be reserved specifically for the process that underpins perceptual object formation. To unambiguously differentiate binding form other types of integration, behavioral and neural studies must investigate perception of a feature orthogonal to the features that link the auditory and visual stimuli. We argue that supporting true perceptual binding (as opposed to other processes such as decision-making) is one role for cross-sensory influences in early sensory cortex. These early multisensory interactions may therefore form a physiological substrate for the bottom-up grouping of auditory and visual stimuli into auditory-visual (AV) objects.

KEYWORDS:

auditory cortex; binding; crossmodal; multisensory; neurophysiology; psychophysics

PMID:
26775728
PMCID:
PMC4738154
DOI:
10.1016/j.tins.2015.12.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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