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Eur Urol. 2016 Oct;70(4):576-585. doi: 10.1016/j.eururo.2015.12.032. Epub 2016 Jan 7.

Physical Activity and Survival After Prostate Cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention Research, CancerControl Alberta, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Department of Oncology, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: christine.friedenreich@albertahealthservices.ca.
2
Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention Research, CancerControl Alberta, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
3
Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention Research, CancerControl Alberta, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Department of Oncology, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Faculty of Science, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
4
Department of Oncology, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Division of Population, Public and Aboriginal Health, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
5
Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Despite the high global prevalence of prostate cancer (PCa), few epidemiologic studies have assessed physical activity in relation to PCa survival.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate different types, intensities, and timing of physical activity relative to PCa survival.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

A prospective study was conducted in Alberta, Canada, in a cohort of 830 stage II-IV incident PCa cases diagnosed between 1997 and 2000 with follow-up to 2014 (up to 17 yr). Prediagnosis lifetime activity was self-reported at diagnosis. Postdiagnosis activity was self-reported up to three times during follow-up.

OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS:

Cox proportional hazards models related physical activity to all-cause and PCa-specific deaths and to first recurrence/progression of PCa.

RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS:

A total of 458 deaths, 170 PCa-specific deaths, and, after first follow-up, 239 first recurrences/progressions occurred. Postdiagnosis total activity (>119 vs ≤42 metabolic equivalent [MET]-hours/week per year) was associated with a significantly lower all-cause mortality risk (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.42-0.79; p value for trend <0.01). Postdiagnosis recreational activity (>26 vs ≤4 MET-hours/week per year) was associated with a significantly lower PCa-specific mortality risk (HR: 0.56; 95% CI, 0.35-0.90; p value for trend = 0.01). Sustained recreational activity before and after diagnosis (>18-20 vs <7-8 MET-hours/week per year) was associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality (HR: 0.66; 95% CI, 0.49-0.88). Limitations included generalisability to healthier cases and an observational study design.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings support emerging recommendations to increase physical activity after the diagnosis of PCa and would inform a future exercise intervention trial examining PCa outcomes.

PATIENT SUMMARY:

In a 17-yr prostate cancer (PCa) survival study, men who survived at least 2 yr who were more physically active postdiagnosis or performed more recreational physical activity before and after diagnosis survived longer. Recreational physical activity after diagnosis was associated with a lower risk of PCa death.

KEYWORDS:

Physical activity; Prospective cohort; Prostate cancer; Sedentary behaviour; Survival analysis

PMID:
26774959
DOI:
10.1016/j.eururo.2015.12.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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