Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nutr Res. 2016 Jan;36(1):24-30. doi: 10.1016/j.nutres.2015.10.011. Epub 2015 Oct 31.

Dietary supplementation with purified citrus limonin glucoside does not alter ex vivo functions of circulating T lymphocytes or monocytes in overweight/obese human adults.

Author information

1
Western Human Nutrition Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Davis, CA 95616-8683, USA.
2
Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA.
3
Western Regional Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Albany, CA 94710, USA.
4
Western Human Nutrition Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Davis, CA 95616-8683, USA. Electronic address: darshan.kelley@ars.usda.gov.

Abstract

Overweight/obesity is associated with chronic inflammation and impairs both innate and adaptive immune responses. Limonoids found in citrus fruits decreased cell proliferation and inflammation in animal studies. We hypothesized that limonin glucoside (LG) supplementation in vivo will decrease the ex vivo proliferation of T cells and the production of inflammatory cytokines by monocytes and T cells. In a double-blind, randomized, cross-over study, 10 overweight/obese human subjects were served purified LG or placebo drinks for 56 days each to determine the effects of LG on immune cell functions. The percentage of CD14+CD36+ cells in whole blood was analyzed by flow cytometry. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and activated with CD3 plus CD28 antibodies (T-lymphocyte activation) or lipopolysaccharide (monocyte activation). Interferon γ, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL) 2, IL-4, and IL-10 were measured in supernatants from activated T cells. Supernatants from activated monocytes were analyzed for the production of tumor necrosis factor α, IL-1β, and IL-6. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were prestained with PKH dye and activated with CD3 plus CD28 antibodies to determine the proliferative responses of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes by flow cytometry. No differences were observed for CD14+CD36+ monocyte populations, T-cell proliferation, or the production of T cell and monocyte cytokines between the 2 treatments. Thus, LG supplementation in vivo did not affect ex vivo functions of T cells and monocytes, whereas it decreased several circulating markers of hepatic inflammation as we previously reported.

KEYWORDS:

Citrus limonin glucoside; Cytokines; Monocytes; Overweight/obese humans; T lymphocytes

PMID:
26773778
DOI:
10.1016/j.nutres.2015.10.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center