Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cancer Med. 2016 Apr;5(4):640-8. doi: 10.1002/cam4.627. Epub 2016 Jan 15.

Adjunctive Chinese Herbal Medicine therapy improves survival of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia: a nationwide population-based cohort study.

Fleischer T1, Chang TT2,3,4, Chiang JH5,6,7, Chang CM8,9, Hsieh CY10, Yen HR2,3,7,11.

Author information

1
Graduate Institute of Chinese Medicine, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
2
Department of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
3
School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
4
School of Post-baccalaureate Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
5
Management Office for Health Data, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
6
Graduate Institute of Integrated Medicine, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
7
Research Center for Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
8
Center for Traditional Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
9
Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Graduate Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
10
Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
11
Research Center for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.

Abstract

Despite good clinical results of current drugs, a good reason still exists to search for additional therapies for the management of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML). Chinese Herbal Medicine (CHM) has thus far been overlooked by researchers and no data exists on the subject. We studied the impact of adjunctive CHM on the disease course of CML, using mortality as the major outcome measurement. We used the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database to perform a nationwide population-based cohort study. Our study included CML patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2010. We matched groups according to age, sex, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) score and use of imatinib, and compared the Hazard Ratios (HR) of CHM group and non-CHM users, as well as characterized trends of prescriptions used for treating CML. 1371 patients were diagnosed with CML in the years examined, of which 466 were included in to this study. We found that the HR of CHM group was significantly lower compared to non-CHM groups (0.32, 95% CI 0.22-0.48, P < 0.0001). We also established that this association between reduced HR was dose-dependent, and the longer CHM users received prescriptions, the lower the HR (P < 0.01). We also analyzed the most commonly used herbal products as well as the HR associated to their use, thus providing future research candidates. Our results supply a strong reason to assume that when administered by properly trained physicians, CHM may have a substantial positive impact on the management of CML.

KEYWORDS:

CML; Chinese herbal medicine; NHIRD; Taiwan; leukemia

PMID:
26773538
PMCID:
PMC4831282
DOI:
10.1002/cam4.627
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center